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A Quick Tour of Adobe InDesign CS2

A Quick Tour of Adobe InDesign CS2


This interactive demonstration of Adobe InDesign CS2 provides an overview of key features of the program. It should take you approximately 45 minutes to complete.

Getting started

You’ll start the tour by opening a partially completed document. You’ll add the finishing touches to this six-page article on Mexican folk art, written for an imaginary travel magazine. If you have not already done so in this session, you should restore the default preferences for InDesign CS2. Restoring default preferences ensures that the tools and palettes function exactly as described in this lesson. After you learn how to use InDesign CS2, this step is no longer necessary.

Note

If you are new to InDesign, you might want to begin with Lesson 1, “Getting to Know the Work Area.”


1.
Delete or reset the InDesign CS2 Defaults file and the InDesign CS2 SavedData file, following the procedure in “Restoring default preferences” on page 2.

2.
Start Adobe InDesign CS2. When the Welcome Screen appears, choose Close.

3.
Click the Go to Bridge button () in the Control palette. As a default, the Control palette is located at the top of the InDesign work area. Using the Folders tab, in the upper left of the Bridge window, locate the Lesson_00 folder in the InDesignCIB folder you copied from the InDesign CS2 Classroom in a Book CD to your hard disk.

Note

If you did not purchase InDesign CS2 as a part of the Creative Suite 2 package, see the note on page 15.

4.
In the Lesson_00 folder, click once on the Tour_done.indd file in the right side of the Bridge window. On the left side of the Bridge window in the Metadata tab, information about the Tour_done.indd file is displayed.

You can view information about the document including colors, fonts, version of InDesign used to create it, and more, by scrolling through the panes on the left side of the Bridge window. You can scale the preview thumbnails by using the scrollbar at the bottom of the Bridge window.

5.
Double-click on the Tour_done.indd file to open it.

The finished tour document.

Note

While the Bridge provides a convenient way to access your files and see more information about each file without needing to open it, you can also open files by choosing File > Open at any time. It is not necessary to use Bridge to access your InDesign files, although we recommend using it to work with your files. Read more about Adobe Bridge in Lesson 14, “Working with Adobe Bridge and Version Cue.”


Press Alt+Ctrl+0 (zero) (Windows) or Option+Command+0 (Mac OS) to make the first page spread fit in the InDesign window. This is the 6-page tour file that you will complete in this lesson. You can leave it open for reference, or choose File > Close.

Viewing the lesson document

1.
Adobe Bridge remains open until you Exit from the application. Return to the Adobe Bridge application and double-click on Tour.indd file. The Tour file opens.

2.
Choose View > Fit Spread in Window. The Fit Spread in Window option displays all the adjoining pages in a spread.

The first spread (pages 2 and 3) appears on your screen. You’ll now look at the rest of the 6-page article using several navigation methods. First, you’ll use the Navigator palette, which is useful for changing the view magnification.

3.
Choose File > Save As. Choose Lesson_00 in the Save As window and enter the name Tour_lesson. Leave the file type as InDesign CS2 document, and choose Save.

4.
Choose Window > Object & Layout > Navigator to open the Navigator palette.

5.
Position the pointer, click on the Palette-menu button () on the right side of the palette and choose View All Spreads.

Like many palettes, the Navigator palette has a menu that displays additional options.

6.
Drag the lower right corner of the palette down and to the right. Expanding the size of the palette provides a better view of the spreads.

7.
In the Navigator palette, click the center of the middle spread to view pages 4 and 5.

Notice the red view box in the Navigator palette. This box shows which area of the document is displayed. By rolling over the red view box, the cursor changes to a hand icon, allowing you to reposition the view.

The slider at the bottom of the palette controls the magnification of the document being displayed. Moving the slider to the right increases the magnification, while moving to the left decreases the magnification. The red view box changes size as you move the slider left or right. The red view box appears smaller at greater magnification levels.

8.
Choose View > Fit Page in Window. You can see that the magnification displayed in the Navigator palette is automatically updated. You can use the Navigator palette to easily move between pages in your documents, or to move to specific sections of a page.

Now we’ll look at the Pages palette, which is another useful tool for navigating in your documents. You’ll use the Pages palette throughout this tour, so you’ll separate the Pages palette from the docking area.

9.
Click the Pages palette tab and drag it to the left, away from the other palettes. Release the palette when it is separated from the docking area. This causes the palette to detach from the docking area on the right. Now it can be positioned in a different location.

Feel free to move and rearrange palettes in this Quick Tour as needed. You can move a palette by dragging its title bar. You can place a palette in the docking area on the right side of the document window by dragging a palette by its tab to this portion of the window. You can also minimize the palette by clicking on the Minimize button, or close the palette by clicking on the Close button on the top bar of a palette that has been separated from the docking area.


10.
In the Pages palette, double-click the numbers 6-7 below the page icons to view the last spread in the document.

Double-clicking the numbers below the page icons centers the full spread in the document window. Double-clicking an individual page icon centers that page in the document window.

Now that you’ve seen all three spreads, let’s go back to page 3 and start working.

11.
In the Pages palette, double-click the page 3 icon to view page 3.

Changing the viewing mode

You can change the viewing mode of a document window using the Mode buttons at the bottom of the toolbox. Use Preview to easily hide nonprinting elements such as guides, grids, and frame edges. You can also preview the document with the bleed or slug areas included.

The Preview Mode button.

Click and hold on the Preview Mode button () at the bottom of the toolbox to choose a Preview mode. Preview Mode displays artwork in a standard window, hiding nonprinting elements such as guides, grids, and frame edges.

Choose the Bleed mode button () to preview the document along with its predefined bleed area that extends beyond the page boundaries.

Choose the Slug mode button () to preview the document along with the predefined slug area. The slug area is an area outside the page and bleed that contains printer instructions or job sign-off information.

Choose the Normal mode button () at the bottom of the toolbox to return to the normal view.

You can also choose View > Screen Mode and then select one of the four viewing modes. A checkmark indicates the selected view mode.


Viewing guides

In this document, the guides are hidden. You’ll turn on the guides to make it easy to see your layout grid and snap objects into place. The guides do not print and do not limit the print area. Guides are for your reference only and can be helpful when aligning objects and text on your page.

  • Choose View > Grids & Guides > Show Guides.

Before and after turning on guides.

Adding text

You can import text created in separate word processing programs, or create text using InDesign CS2. In this exercise, you will add a secondary headline to page 3.

1.
Using the Type tool (), click and drag to create a box for this headline between the two guides below the word Mexico, in the right column of the page.

If the text box is not aligned exactly to the size of the guides, use the Selection tool () to click on the corners of the box and enlarge or reduce them as necessary and then re-select the Type tool.

2.
Enter the text Exploring Mexican Folk Art in the text box.

InDesign CS2 placed the text insertion point in the frame after it was created because it was built using the Type tool. For text frames created with other tools, you will first need to click within the text frame using the Type tool before entering text.

3.
Use the Type tool to select the text just entered by placing the cursor into the text frame and choosing Edit > Select All to select the text.

4.
Use the Control palette to change text attributes. Click on the arrow () to the right of the Font Name drop-down menu and select Adobe Garamond Pro Regular. (Adobe Garamond Pro is alphabetized on the list under “G,” not “A.”)

5.
Click on the arrow () to the right of the Font Size drop-down menu and select “18 points.”

You can select individual words and characters using the Type tool to format text, as you would with traditional word-processing software.


Threading text in frames

As a general rule, text is placed inside frames with InDesign CS2. You can either add text to a frame that has already been created, or you can create the frame while you import text.

Placing and flowing text

An article describing Judith and Clyde’s trip to Oaxaca has been saved in a word-processor file. You’ll place this file on page 3 and then thread it throughout your document.

1.
Make sure that no objects are selected by choosing Edit > Deselect All, and then choose File > Place. In the Place dialog box, navigate to the Lesson_00 folder in the Lessons folder and double-click the 00_a.doc file.

The cursor changes to a loaded text icon (). With a loaded text icon, you have several choices. You can drag to create a new text frame, click inside an existing frame, or click to create a new text frame within a column. You’ll add this text to a column in the lower half of page 3.

2.
Position the loaded text icon just below the fourth guide from the bottom margin and just to the right of the left margin, and click.

3.
The text flows into a new frame in the lower half of the first column on page 3. When a text frame has more text than can fit, the frame is said to have overset text. Overset text is indicated by a red plus symbol in the out port of the frame, which is the small square just above the lower right corner of the frame. You can link overset text to another frame, create a new frame into which the overset text will flow, or expand the size of the frame so that the text is no longer overset.

Note

If the text box is not placed in the left column, click the Selection tool and drag the sizing handles to move it to the proper location.

4.
Choose the Selection tool (), then click the out port in the selected frame. The cursor becomes a loaded text icon. Now you’ll add a column of text to the lower half of the second column.

5.
Position the loaded text icon immediately below the fourth guide from the bottom margin and just to the right of the second column guide (be sure not to click on the previously created text frame above), and click. Text now fills the lower portion of the right column.

You can also divide a single text box into multiple columns by selecting the box and setting the number of columns in the Control palette. This allows you to create multiple columns of type without flowing text.


Threading text

Clicking the out port and then linking to a text frame is called manual threading.

1.
Using the Selection tool (), click the out port in the second column on page 3.

This prepares InDesign CS2 to flow the overset text from this text frame to another frame.

2.
In the Pages palette, double-click the page 4 icon to center page 4 in the document window.

3.
Press and hold the Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) key and position the loaded text icon in the upper left corner of the first column. Click, and then release the Alt/Option key.

The text flows into the left column. Because you held down Alt/Option, the cursor remains a loaded text icon and you do not need to click in the out port before flowing text from this frame.

Note

After clicking the out port of a text frame, you can hold the Shift key to thread text automatically. Automatically flowing text places any overset text onto the pages of a document, adding pages as necessary. Because the design of this document calls for text to appear only on certain pages, the option to automatically flow text is not appropriate in this document.

4.
Position the loaded text icon in the upper left corner of the second column on page 4, and click.

Whenever the cursor displays a loaded text icon, you can click any tool in the toolbar to stop flowing text. No text is lost, and any overset text remains.


Now you’ll flow the remaining text into the bottom of the two columns on page 7.

5.
Click the out port in the second column of page 4, and then in the Pages palette, double-click the page 7 icon, centering page 7 in the document window.

6.
Press and hold Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS), and position the loaded text icon in the left column, below the guide on page 7, and click. Release the Alt or Option key. The cursor remains as a loaded text icon, as additional text needs to be flowed.

7.
Position the loaded text icon in the second column below the guide, and click. The remaining text from the story flows into the second column. Note that the out port in the lower right corner of the text frame is hollow, indicating that there is no additional text to flow from this frame.

You have finished threading text frames in this document. A threaded set of frames is called a story.

8.
Choose File > Save.

Adding a pull-quote

To enhance the design on page 4 of your document, you’ll add a pull-quote. We copied text from the article and placed it into a frame on the pasteboard, which is the area outside the page. You will position this pull-quote text frame in the middle of page 4 and finish formatting it.

1.
Choose View > Fit Page in Window.

2.
In the lower left corner of the document window, click and hold on the arrow () to the right of the page number indicator. Select page 4 from the list of available pages.

If you cannot see the pull-quote text frame to the left of page 4, locate the scroll box on the horizontal scroll bar, and drag it to the left.

3.
In the Control palette located just below the menus at the top of the page, click and then enter an X value of 4 in and a Y value of 3 in, and then press the Enter or Return key on your keyboard. InDesign moves the selected object to the specified location.

4.
If necessary, use the Arrow keys to nudge the location of the frame. The bottom of the frame should pass through the middle of the red star. The pull-quote should now be centered between the columns of text on page 4.

With Adobe InDesign CS2 you can use most forms of measurement throughout the program, including palettes and dialog boxes, as long as you identify them with standard abbreviations, such as in for inch, pt for point or cm for centimeter. InDesign converts the units you enter into the default unit of measurement, which can be changed in Edits > Preferences > Units & Increments.


Wrapping text around an object

The text in the pull-quote is difficult to read because the main story text does not wrap around the text frame. You’ll wrap the main story text around the edges of the pull-quote text frame, so the text from the main story will not overlap the pull-quote.

1.
Make sure the pull-quote frame is selected.

2.
Choose Window > Text Wrap.

3.
In the Text Wrap palette, click the third button from the left side (). This causes text to wrap around the object’s shape.

4.
Click the Close box to close the Text Wrap palette. You can always access this palette or other palettes from the Window menu.

5.
Choose File > Save.

Adding a stroke to the frame

Now you’ll change the color of the text frame so that the stroke, also described as a border, matches the color of the red star. When you apply colors using InDesign, it’s a good idea to use the Swatches palette. Using the Swatches palette makes it easy to apply, edit, and update colors efficiently for all objects in a document.

This magazine article is intended for printing at a commercial press, so it uses CMYK process colors. We’ve already added the set of necessary colors to the Swatches palette.

1.
Choose Window > Swatches.

2.
With the text frame still selected, click the Stroke box () in the top of the Swatches palette and then select PANTONE Warm Red CVC in the Swatches palette. You may need to scroll down to select. Selecting the Stroke box causes the frame of the image to be affected by the color you selected.

3.
To change the weight of the stroke, right-click (Windows) or Ctrl+click (Mac OS) on the frame, and select Stroke Weight > 0.5 pt from the context menu that appears. The context menus are an easy way to change many attributes of a selected object, including the stroke weight.

4.
Choose Edit > Deselect All.

The text frame now has a thin red stroke.

5.
Choose File > Save.

Changing the frame and text position

The text in the pull-quote frame is too close to the edge, making it unattractive and difficult to read. You’ll now change the position of the text within the frame and change the style of the border.

1.
Using the Selection tool (), click the pull-quote text frame to select it, and then choose the Align Center () option from the Control palette.

2.
With the frame still selected, choose the Thick-Thin stroke type from the Control palette.

3.
Use the Control palette to increase the stroke weight to 4 pt, by using the option immediately above the stroke style selection you used in the previous step.

You can also use the Control palette to easily adjust other important attributes for objects on a page, such as size and position.

Adjusting the size of an image

Next you will adjust the size of the picture of the crescent moon on the adjacent page.

1.
If necessary, choose page 5 from the drop-down menu in the lower left-hand corner of the document window to move to this page.

2.
Choose the Selection tool () and click to select the picture of the crescent moon.

3.
Using the Control palette, choose 50% from the X Scale %, which is the top of the two scaling values in the Control palette.

Both the vertical and horizontal sizes adjust proportionally. This is because the Constrain Proportions for Scaling button () is selected to the right of the scaling percentages. You can deselect this button, if you wish, to adjust one value independent of the other. As a general rule, bitmap images, such as those scanned or taken with a digital camera, should not be scaled disproportionately and should not be scaled beyond 120% of their original size, due to the possible loss of quality. In this case, we were proportionally reducing the size of the image, which generally has no adverse impact on its quality.

4.
Choose File > Save.

Working with styles

InDesign CS2 includes three kinds of styles: paragraph, character, and object. A paragraph style includes formatting attributes that apply to all text within a paragraph. You do not need to select text to apply a paragraph style, as it applies to all text in the paragraph where your cursor is located. A character style includes only character attributes, making it useful for formatting words and phrases within a paragraph. Text must be selected to apply a character style. An object style allows you to create and apply formatting to selected objects. Using an object style, you can set fill and stroke color, stroke and corner effects, transparency, drop shadows, feathering, text frame options, and even text wrap on a selected object.

Applying paragraph styles

You’ll start by applying styles to text, and then move on to object styles. To save time, we created paragraph styles that you’ll apply to the text. These styles will help you format the body text in the article.

1.
In the Pages palette, double-click the page 3 icon to center page 3 in the document window.

2.
Select the Type tool (), and then click anywhere in the columns of text that you previously placed on this page.

3.
Choose Edit > Select All to select the text in all the frames of the story.

4.
Choose Type > Paragraph Styles to display the Paragraph Styles palette.

5.
In the Paragraph Styles palette, click Body Text to format the entire story with the Body Text style.

You can also apply styles from the Character and Paragraph Formatting Control palettes by selecting the style name from the drop-down menu.


6.
Choose Edit > Deselect All to deselect the text.

Now you’ll apply a different paragraph style to the first paragraph of the story.

7.
Using the Type tool, click anywhere in the first paragraph on page 3.

8.
In the Paragraph Styles palette, select Body Text/Drop Cap. Paragraph styles can include a variety of text formatting options, including drop caps.

9.
Choose File > Save.

Formatting text for the character style

Now you’ll create and apply a character style to emphasize page references within the paragraphs. Before you create this character style, you’ll use the Character palette to italicize the text and make it one point smaller. You’ll then base the character style on this formatted text, allowing you to easily apply this same style to other text throughout the document.

1.
In the Pages palette, double-click the page 7 icon to center page 7 in the document window. To make sure that you can read the text at the bottom of this page, press Ctrl and + (the plus sign) (Windows) or Command and + (Mac OS) to zoom in.

Within the text, there are three references to other pages: (page 7), (page 2), and (page 5). If necessary, use the scroll bars to display this portion of the document window.

2.
Using the Type tool (), select the “(page 7)” reference.

3.
Select Italic from the Type Style menu in the Control palette. For font size (), select 11 pt. The page reference is now formatted.

4.
Choose File > Save.

Creating and applying a character style

Now that you have formatted the text, you are ready to create a character style.

1.
Make sure that the text you formatted is still selected, and choose Type > Character Styles to display the Character Styles palette.

2.
Press the Alt key (Windows) or Option key (Mac OS) and click the New Style button () at the bottom of the Character Styles palette.

The New Character Style window appears and a new character style named Character Style 1 is created. This new style includes the characteristics of the selected text.

3.
For Style Name, type Emphasis and click OK.

4.
Using the Type tool (), select the text (page 2) in the next paragraph, and then click Emphasis in the Character Styles palette to apply the style.

5.
Apply the character style Emphasis to the text “(page 5)” in the same paragraph.

Because you used a character style instead of a paragraph style, the style affected only the selected text, not the entire paragraph.

6.
Return the previous paragraph to select the text “(page 7),” click Emphasis in the Character Styles palette to apply the style.

Even though you established the style using this text, it never had the style applied. This tags the text to update automatically if the character style attributes are updated.

7.
Choose File > Save.

Applying object styles

To save time, we created an object style that you’ll apply to the pull-quote on page 4. Use object styles to apply multiple formatting attributes to an object, including text and picture frames.

1.
In the Pages palette, double-click the page 4 icon to center page 4 in the document window.

2.
Choose the Selection tool () and click the pull-quote, selecting the text frame.

3.
Choose Window > Object Styles to display the Object Styles palette.

4.
In the Object Styles palette, hold the Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) key and click Pull-Quote to format the selected object with the Pull-Quote object style.

Note

Holding the Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) key clears any existing formatting when applying a style to an object or text.

5.
Choose File > Save.

Working with graphics

Graphics used in an InDesign CS2 document are placed inside of frames. When working with placed graphics, you should become familiar with the three Selection tools.

The Selection tool () is used for general layout tasks, such as positioning and moving objects on a page. The Direct Selection tool () is used for tasks involving the content of the frame, or drawing and editing paths; for example, to select frame contents or to move an anchor point on a path. The Direct Selection tool is also used for selecting objects within groups. The Position tool (), hidden in the Direct Selection tool, works in conjunction with the Selection tool to help control the placement of content within a frame, as well as to change the size of the frame. You can use this tool to move a graphic within its frame, or change the visible area of a graphic by adjusting its crop. The Position tool is grouped with the Direct Selection tool in the Tool palette. You may need to click and hold on the Direct Selection tool to select the Position tool.

Note

While learning about the difference between frames and their content, you may want to make frame edges visible by selecting View > Show Frame edges.


Positioning graphics within a frame

Two of the pictures on the first spread need to have their frames resized or the pictures within them repositioned.

1.
Select page 2 in the lower left corner of the document window to navigate to page 2. Press Ctrl+0 (zero) (Windows) or Command+0 (Mac OS) to fit the page in the window.

2.
Using the Direct Selection tool (), position your cursor over the picture of the red sun, which is half-visible. Notice that the cursor changes to a Hand tool, indicating that you can select and manipulate the content of the frame. Click and drag the picture to the right, making the entire sun visible. With the Direct Selection tool, you can reposition graphics within their frame.

3.
Using the Selection tool (), click on the picture of the blue hand on the top left side of the page.

4.
Click and drag the top center handle upward to expand the size of the frame. By making the frame larger, more of its contents become visible.

You can preview the picture as you move or resize the frame if you pause briefly after you first click the frame or picture, and then resize or move the picture or frame.


5.
Choose File > Save.

About the Position tool

The Position tool () works in conjunction with the Selection tool () to help control the placement of content within a frame. It can also be used to change the size of the frame.

The Position tool is dynamic, and it can be used with either text or graphics. When it’s placed over a graphic, it changes to a hand icon (), indicating that you can manipulate the content within a frame. When it’s positioned over a text frame, the cursor changes to an I-beam, indicating it can be used to add or edit text.

1.
Select the Position tool from the toolbox, by clicking and holding on the Direct Selection tool.

2.
Press Ctrl+J (Windows) or Command+J (Mac OS) and type 3, press Enter. This keyboard shortcut takes you to page 3. Roll over the text “Exploring Mexican Folk. Notice that your cursor changes into the text I-beam.

3.
Triple-click on the text to select it. Click and drag over the value in the Font size text field in the Control palette. Type 20 and press Return to change the font size to 20 pt.

Targeting layers when placing

Like both Illustrator CS2 and Photoshop CS2, InDesign CS2 lets you place objects on different layers. Think of layers as sheets of transparent film that are stacked on top of each other. By using layers, you can create and edit objects on one layer without affecting—or being affected by—objects on other layers. Layers also determine the stacking position of objects.

Before you import a photograph of an armadillo into your design, you’ll make sure that you add the frame to the appropriate layer.

1.
In the Pages palette, double-click the page 3 icon to center page 3 in the document window.

2.
Choose Window > Layers to display the Layers palette.

3.
Click the word “Photos” in the Layers palette to target the Photos layer. Do not click the boxes to the left of the Photos layer, or you’ll hide or lock the layer.

4.
Select the Selection tool ().

5.
Choose Edit > Deselect All. If this option is grayed out, everything is already deselected.

6.
Choose File > Place. If necessary, navigate to the Lesson_00 folder and double-click the armadillo.tif. InDesign lets you import images using a variety of file types, including native Photoshop and Illustrator files.

7.
With the loaded graphics icon (), click in the white area above the top margin to place the armadillo at the top of the page. You’ll move the graphic later, after you rotate and crop it.

Notice that the armadillo frame is the same color as the Photos layer in the Layers palette. An object’s frame color describes the layer on which it resides.

8.
In the Layers palette, click the box next to the Text layer name so that the layer lock icon () appears.

Locking this layer prevents you from selecting or making any changes to the Text layer or any objects on that layer. With the Text layer locked, you can edit the frame containing the armadillo without accidentally selecting the frame containing “Hecho en Mexico.”

Cropping and moving the photograph

You’ll now use the Selection tool to crop and move the photograph.

1.
Choose Edit > Deselect All.

2.
Select the Selection tool () in the toolbox, and then click the armadillo.

3.
Position the pointer over the middle handle on the right side of the armadillo frame and hold down the mouse button. Drag the frame toward the center of the armadillo to crop it.

4.
Using the Selection tool, position the pointer over the center of the armadillo frame and drag the object so that it snaps to the right edge of the page.

Notice that the edge of the armadillo is behind the decorative border. This is because the Photos layer is below the Graphics layer in the Layers palette.

5.
Choose File > Save.

Exploring on your own

Congratulations! You’ve completed the InDesign CS2 tour. You’re now ready to create your own InDesign CS2 documents. To learn more about InDesign CS2, you may want to try the following:

  • Continue experimenting with the travel document. Add new pages, edit the master pages, move items among the layers, create text frames, and adjust the graphics using the tools in the toolbox.

  • Choose Help > InDesign Help to use Adobe InDesign CS2 Help.

  • Go through the lessons in the rest of this book.

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