• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 4. Text Input > Frames illustrated

Frames illustrated

Sometimes simplest is best.

These star-shaped Bézier boxes have dashed or striped frames. They were created using the Starburst tool.

Text boxes can be made see-through so they can be layered on top of each other.

To make a text box see-through:

1.
Choose the Item or Content tool.

2.
If all the items you want to work with are on the same layer, click the text box that is to be on top. And if it's not on top, choose Item > Bring to Front (F5). If the items are on different layers, make sure the layers are in the correct stacking order (see page 280).

3.
Choose Item > Runaround (Cmd-T/Ctrl-T).

4.
Choose Type: None , then click OK.

5.
If the Colors palette isn't already open, choose View > Show Colors (F12).

6.
Click the Background Color button on the Colors palette .

The Colors palette

7.
Click None . (Don't choose Black at a 0 shade percentage; that would make the box opaque white—not transparent.)

Text in a transparent box on top of a picture


TIP

To select an item that's behind another item, Cmd-Option-Shift-click/Ctrl-Alt-Shift-click. Each click will select the next item behind the currently selected items under the pointer (more about this on page 195).


TIP

To group multiple items so they'll move in unison, see page 184.


To move text downward in its box:

Get there fast

With the Item tool selected, you can double-click inside a text box (or picture box, line, or table) to open the Modify dialog box. Cmd/Ctrl double-click the item if the Content tool is selected.


To move the first line of text downward from the top of its box, select the box, choose Item > Modify (Cmd-M/Ctrl-M), click the Text tab, then enter a First Baseline: Offset value greater than 0. This value will be in addition to the current Text Inset value. From the Minimum pop-up menu, choose whether, at minimum, the first line of text will be offset from the top of the box as measured from the line's largest Cap Height, Cap + Accent [mark], or Ascent (top of the tallest character, as in an “l”or a “T”) . This feature isn't available for HTML text (text in a Web layout for which Convert to Graphic on Export is unchecked in Item > Modify).

First Baseline 0


First Baseline 1p6


or

Choose Item > Modify (Cmd-M/Ctrl-M), check Text Inset: Multiple Insets, then enter a higher Top value.

or

This may feel like cheating, but sometimes simplest is best: Just yank the whole box downward on the page with the Item tool.

To rotate text in a box without rotating its box, follow these instructions. To rotate text and its box, see the following page.

To change the text angle:

1.
Choose the Item or Content tool.

2.
Click a text box of any shape (not HTML text). You can change the angle for text in only one item at a time.

3.
Choose Item > Modify (Cmd-M/Ctrl-M), then click the Text tab.

4.
Enter a Text Angle value between –360° and 360°, then click Apply to preview.

5.
Click OK . The text can still be edited. You can restore the Text Angle to 0° at any time.

A Text Angle of 35°: The text is rotated; the box isn't.


TIP

To skew text , follow the instructions above, except click the Box tab in Item > Modify, then enter a Skew value between –75 and 75.

A rectangular text box skewed at a 40° angle: Both the text and the box are skewed.



To rotate a text box using the Measurements palette:

1.
Choose the Item or Content tool.

2.
Click a text box (not an HTML text box).

3.
In the rotation field on the Measurements palette, enter a positive value between 0° and 360° to rotate the box counterclockwise or a negative value to rotate it clockwise, then press Return/Enter. You can edit the text in its rotated position.

To rotate a text box using the Rotation tool:

1.
Choose the Rotation tool.

2.
Click a text box (not an HTML text box).

3.
Press to create an axis point for rotation, then drag the mouse away from the axis to create a “lever” . The further you drag away from the axis before rotating, the easier the rotation will be to control.

4.
Drag clockwise or counterclockwise . Hold down Shift while dragging to rotate at an increment of 45° (release the mouse first).

The box rotated -90°


The flip commands flip all the text in a box, but not the box itself. Text can be modified in its flipped position.

To flip text:

1.
Choose the Content tool.

2.
Click a text box (not an HTML text box).

3.
Choose Style > Flip Horizontal or Flip Vertical.

or

Click the Flip Horizontal and/or Flip Vertical button on the Measurements palette .

The word “backwards” is in a separate text box, and it's flipped horizontally.


The text box containing the gray “Narcissus” was flipped vertically.


To wrap text around another item:

Wrapping all around

Normally, text will wrap around only three sides of an item that's situated within a column. To wrap text around all sides of an item within a column, select the box that contains the text that's doing the wrapping, choose Item > Modify, click the Text tab, check Run Text Around All Sides, then click OK. See page 208.


1.
Stack the item that you want to wrap text around on top of a text box. To move a box to the front of its layer, select it with the Item or Content tool, then choose Item > Bring to Front (F5) (read about layers in Chapter 16).

2.
With the new box still selected, choose Item > Runaround (Cmd-T/Ctrl-T).

3.
Choose Type: Item .

In the Runaround pane of Item > Modify, choose Type: Item, then enter Top, Left, Bottom, and Right values.


4.
For a rectangular box, enter Top, Left, Bottom, and Right values for the space between the item in front and the type that's wrapping around it (press Tab to move quickly from field to field).

or

For a nonrectangular box, enter a single Outset value, which will apply to all of its sides.

Note: If you're entering a value in points, you don't have to reenter the “pt”.

5.
Click Apply to preview, make any adjustments, then click OK

Text will wrap around only three sides of an item that's situated within a column, unless Run Text Around All Sides is on for the text that's doing the wrapping (see the sidebar, above).


Text will always wrap around all four sides of an item if the item straddles more than one column.


The Vertical Alignment options affect all the text contained in a box. Leading (line spacing) and interparagraph spacing, which affect one or more paragraphs, are discussed in Chapter 6.

To change vertical alignment:

1.
Choose the Item or Content tool, then click a rectangular text box. Or choose the Item tool, then select multiple boxes (see page 183).

2.
Choose Item > Modify (Cmd-M/Ctrl-M).

3.
Click the Text tab.

4.
From the Vertical Alignment: Type pop-up menu, choose Top, Centered, Bottom, or Justified .

5.
In vertically justified text with an Inter ¶ Max value of 0, space is added evenly between lines and paragraphs. An Inter ¶ Max value greater than 0 is the maximum space that can be added between paragraphs before leading is affected. Try raising this value and see what happens.

6.
Click Apply to preview, then click OK . Note: Make sure there isn't a return at the end of the last line in a box to which Bottom, Centered, or Justified Vertical Alignment has been applied, or the alignment will be thrown off. The Vertical Alignment options are also affected by the First Baseline and Text Inset: Top values.

Top vertical alignment

Bottom vertical alignment

Centered vertical alignment

Justified vertical alignment


TIP

Vertical justification won't work if the justified text box is behind another box that has a Runaround setting other than None. To make justification work, change the Runaround Type to None for the top box in Item > Runaround.


TIP

If you've chosen Centered alignment and your text happens not to have any descenders (characters that extend below the baseline), you may need to Baseline Shift the type downward slightly to make it look more centered (see page 129).


Follow either set of instructions on this page to change the number of columns and/or the gutter width in an individual box. To change the non-printing margin and column guides or to change the number of columns in a box originating from a master page, follow the instructions on page 243.

To change the number of columns using the Measurements palette:

1.
Choose the Item or Content tool.

2.
Select a text box.

3.
Enter a number in the “Cols” field on the Measurements palette .

4.
Press Return/Enter .

A two-column text box...


...is converted into a three-column text box.


To change columns and/or gutter width using a dialog box:

1.
Choose the Item or Content tool.

2.
Select a text box.

3.
Choose Item > Modify (Cmd-M/Ctrl-M), then click the Text tab.

4.
Change the number in the Columns field (1–30, depending on the width of the box) .

and/or

Change the Gutter Width value for the blank space between the columns.

5.
Click OK.

You can save text from a Quark XPress file as a separate file into any of these formats: ASCII, HTML, XPress Tags, WordPerfect, Microsoft Word, or Rich Text. You can save all the text in a story, or just a highlighted portion.


Comparing the formats

ASCII strips all formatting.

HTML preserves font and type styling for importing and viewing in a browser.

WordPerfect and Microsoft Word may strip some formatting.

XPress Tags retains all formatting. Formatting codes will display with the text when viewed in a word processing application.

Rich Text Format preserves font, font size, type styling, and style sheet information from QuarkXPress.


To save text as a word processing file:

1.
Choose the Content tool.

2.
Highlight the text to be saved.

or

Click in a story.

3.
Choose File > Save Text (Cmd-Option-E/Ctrl-Alt-E).

or

Control-click/Right-click and choose Save Text from the context menu.

4.
Type a name for the text file in the Save As/File name field .

The Save Text dialog box in Windows


5.
If text is highlighted in the layout, you can click Entire Story or Selected Text. If you clicked in a story but didn't highlight any text, the Entire Story option will be chosen for you.

6.
Choose a file format from the Format/Save as Type pop-up menu. A format's import/export filter must be enabled in order for it to appear on the list. Use the XTensions Manager to turn a filter on or off (see page 427).

7.
Optional in Windows: If you've chosen ASCII as the format and you check Mac OS Line Endings, the standard Windows line break that's represented by a return and line feed character will be replaced by just a return character, which is standard in Mac OS X.

8.
Choose a location in which to save the text file.

9.
Click Save (Return/Enter).

TIP

To learn more about XPress Tags, see the QuarkXPress documentation or David Blatner's Real World QuarkXPress 6 (Peachpit Press).


  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint