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Chapter 94. Think Outside the Box: Trans... > Controlling How Flattening Occurs

Controlling How Flattening Occurs

Flattening takes time, and usually adds to the time it takes to print a document—how much depends on the complexity of the page. There’s just no reason to use the highest quality flattening when printing a proof to a desktop laser printer, but you probably don’t mind taking the time to get the best quality on an imagesetter or platesetter. To make the process easier, InDesign ships with three built-in transparency flattener styles: High Resolution, Medium Resolution or Low Resolution. Most of the time, one of these settings will work for whatever you’re doing.

You can select one of these flattener styles from the Print dialog box, the Export PDF dialog box, or the Export EPS dialog box. Generally, you can match the style to the resolution of your printer (low for proofing on low-resolution printers and high for imagesetters and platesetters). You can also override the flattener style for an individual spread, found in the Pages palette flyout menu. It’s rare that you’d need to do that.


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