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Strokes

QuarkXPress and InDesign have similar ways of setting a frame’s stroke (or frame thickness): in XPress, you set the frame to anything more than zero, in InDesign you set the stroke to anything more than zero thickness. However, InDesign not only lets you apply a width and color, you can even apply a gradient. And while QuarkXPress doesn’t allow strokes around type, InDesign not only permits you to outline type and keep it editable, but the stroke can be either a solid color or a gradient.

Note that the weight of a stroke in InDesign is centered on its path, just like in Illustrator: Half of the stroke extends outward, and half inward (see Figure 14-3). However, when you stroke type, InDesign is very smart: Rather than cutting into the shape of the letterform when the stroke weight is increased, it applies the entire stroke weight to the outside of the character, preserving the character’s integrity (see Figure 14-4). Behind the scenes, InDesign is actually stroking the text shape and then filling a non-stroked version (as though there were two characters on top of each other, one stroked and one filled).


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