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Lesson 3. Project proposal > Assembling the first page

Assembling the first page

To assemble the first of three pages of the proposal, you will begin by creating and modifying text. Once the text is formatted, you will create new styles and edit existing styles that you will use throughout the rest of this publication.

Creating the title

After establishing the character and paragraph specifications for the title (Bella Coola) that spans the top of the first page of the proposal, you will type the text and apply a 75% tint of black using the Colors palette.

1.
Select the text tool (), and drag to define a text block that spans the width of the two columns (exact height is not important).

2.
In the Control palette, choose Birch for Font, type 100 for Size (), and click the All Caps button ().

Note

By default, PageMaker automatically sets the leading to 120% of the font size (as indicated in the Control palette).

3.
Type bella coola.

Because you had selected the All Caps button in the Control palette, the text is displayed in uppercase letters.

4.
With the text tool still selected, drag to select the letter B in the word BELLA, and in the Control palette type 120 for Size, and click the Apply button.

Note

If different leading amounts occur within a single line, PageMaker uses the largest leading amount for the entire line. Since leading is a character attribute, you can apply more than one leading amount within the same paragraph.

5.
Drag to select the letter C in the word COOLA, and, in the Control palette, type 120 for Size, and click the Apply button.

6.
With the text tool still selected, triple-click the title text to select it.

7.
In the Control palette, click the Paragraph-view button (), and then click the Force-justify button () to force the title text to spread across the width of the text block (which spans the two columns).

8.
With the text still selected, make sure [Black] is selected in the Colors palette, and choose 75% for Tint to apply a 75% tint of black.

To make the text easier to work with, you will change the leading method used for the title. The leading method controls where text sits in the slug. (As mentioned in Lesson 1, a slug is the vertical space used by each line of type.)

PageMaker lets you choose three different leading methods: proportional (the default method), top of caps, and baseline. Proportional and baseline leading are the most common methods.

A. Proportional leading B. Top of Caps leading C. Baseline leading

The proportional leading method (the method currently applied to the title) aligns the baseline of the text one-third of the slug height above the bottom of the slug. The baseline leading method, on the other hand, aligns the baseline of the text with the bottom of the leading slug.

When using baseline leading, the baseline of the last line of text in a text block aligns with the bottom of the text block. Because you'll be placing text underneath this title, it will be easier to work with other text blocks if the bottom of the title text block is not in the way.

9.
With the text still selected, notice where the text sits in the highlighted leading slug. Choose Type > Paragraph.

10.
In the Paragraph Specifications dialog box, click the Spacing button.

The Spacing Attributes dialog box (Windows) and Paragraph Spacing Attributes dialog box (Mac OS) lets you to control the amount of space inserted between letters and words, the leading method, and the percentage of autoleading. In this example you will use the Spacing Attributes dialog box to override the proportional (default) leading method with the baseline leading method.

11.
In the Spacing Attributes dialog box (Windows) or Paragraph Spacing Attributes dialog box (Mac OS), select Baseline for Leading Method. Hold down Shift (Windows) or Option (Macintosh), and click OK to close all the dialog boxes at once.

Notice that the slug has shifted in the title so that the baseline touches the bottom of the slug.

12.
Select the pointer tool, click the title text to select it as a text block, hold down Shift (to constrain the movement to 90°), and drag the text block to align the top edge of the smaller letters with the top margin guide.

The 120-point letters overlap the top margin.

13.
Choose File > Save.

Placing text using the Autoflow command

Use the Autoflow command when you have a lot of text to place. Flowing text automatically means PageMaker will create new pages until all text is placed, eliminating the need for you to add individual pages.

1.
Choose File > Place, and double-click the 03TextA.doc file in the 03Lesson folder.

2.
Choose Layout > Autoflow.

The pointer changes to an automatic text-flow icon.

PageMaker has three text flow modes, each represented by a different text-flow icon:

Manual flow. Flows one column or text block at a time.

Automatic flow. Flows text column to column until the entire story is placed, adding pages if needed.

Semiautomatic flow. Flows text one column or text block at a time, ending with the loaded text icon if more text remains to be placed.

Whenever you have a loaded text icon, you can switch temporarily between manual and automatic text flow by pressing Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Macintosh). To switch temporarily to semiautomatic flow, hold down Shift when the loaded text icon is displayed.


3.
Making sure the automatic text-flow icon does not overlap the margin guides or column guides, click in column 1 below the title text.

The last lines of text in the story are displayed on page 3 of your publication, indicating PageMaker has automatically inserted two pages.

4.
With the pointer tool selected, click the text in column 1 to select it as a text block.

The plus sign in the top windowshade handle indicates that text from the same story is contained in another text block, and the empty bottom windowshade handle indicates the end of the story.

5.
Click the page 2 icon to view the second page of the publication.

6.
With the pointer tool selected, click the text in either column to select it as a text block.

Note

Depending upon your monitor size and the zoom level, the text in both columns may be grayed-out.

The top and bottom windowshade handles of the selected text block display plus signs (). As just mentioned, a plus sign in the windowshade handle indicates that text from the same story is contained in another text block.

Plus sign

In previous lessons you placed and created stories that were contained in a single text block. Since the story in this lesson is contained in five text blocks, the text in this publication is threaded (through multiple text blocks).

7.
Click the page 1 icon to view the first page of the publication.

8.
With the pointer tool selected, click the text in column 1 to select it as a text block.

The first line of text in column 1 is positioned where you clicked to place the text, with the empty top windowshade handle () indicating the beginning of a story.

Do not worry if the tops of the two text blocks are not aligned at this point. You will be resizing these later to make room for an introductory paragraph that spans both columns.

Note

If no text had been positioned in the top portion of column 2, the entire right column would have been filled with text.

9.
Choose File > Save.

Adjusting the tracking

After formatting the text, you will use the Expert Tracking command to adjust the spacing between letters and words (tracking) in the proposal text. This command is useful for darkening or lightening a page—type with tight tracking darkens a page, and type with loose tracking lightens a page. You can also use Expert Tracking to adjust the spacing of selected lines of very large or very small type (headlines and captions), or to make text fit in a defined space on a page.

1.
Select the text tool (), click the proposal text to establish an insertion point, and choose Edit > Select All to select the entire threaded story.

Note

Once the entire story is formatted, you can apply specific styles to a few specific paragraphs (such as headlines, subheads, etc.) to override the original formatting, saving you the effort of formatting all paragraphs individually.

2.
In the Control palette, click the Character-view button. Choose Myriad Roman for Font, type 8.7 for Size () and 13 for Leading (), and click the Apply button ().

3.
With the text still selected, click the Paragraph-view button () in the Control palette. Then type .25 for First-line Indent (), and click the Justify button ().

The first line of each paragraph is indented, with the left and right edges of the text aligned with the edges of the text block.

Now that the text is formatted, you will use the Expert Tracking command to adjust the spacing between letters and words (tracking) in the proposal text.

4.
Hold down Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Macintosh) together with the spacebar, and drag diagonally across the text in column 1 to enclose half the text block.

In this magnified view, notice how the spacing between letters and words in the proposal text is fairly tight.

5.
With the entire story still selected, choose Type > Expert Tracking > Very Loose.

The Expert Tracking menu displays six tracking options. The default tracking option No Track means no tracking has been applied to the text.

Because Very Loose tracking increases letter spacing for this point size (of this typeface), the loosened tracking makes the page appear lighter.

Note

It is also possible to select a tracking option from the Tracking pop-up menu in the character view of the Control palette.

6.
Choose File > Save.

Varying the number of columns on a page

You can have a different number of columns on different parts of a single page. In this example, you will create a single column of text below the title text, above the two existing columns of text.

You will begin by reducing the size of the text blocks in the left and right columns to make room for a text block that spans the image area (between the left and right margins).

1.
Scroll to view the middle portion of the page.

2.
From the horizontal ruler, drag to create a horizontal ruler guide at approximately 4.17-inches. (Use the Control palette to verify its location as you drag.)

You will drag the top of the text blocks in the two columns down to this horizontal ruler guide. To help you align the text block, you'll first turn the Snap to Guides option back on.

3.
Choose View > Snap to Guides to select (check) the option.

4.
Select the pointer tool, click the text in column 2 to select it as a text block, and drag the top windowshade handle down until it snaps to the horizontal ruler guide you just created.

5.
With the pointer tool still selected, click the text in column 1 to select it as a text block, and drag the top windowshade handle until it snaps to the ruler guide.

PageMaker automatically flows the text when you resize the text blocks, displaying the first line of text in the threaded story at the top of the first text block.

6.
If the baseline of the last line of text in column 2 is not aligned with the bottom margin guide, select the text block and drag the windowshade handle to expose one more line of text. (You can leave column 1 as is; you'll be adding a photograph and caption to it.)

With the size of the text blocks reduced, you have space to create a single column of text below the title text.

7.
Select the text tool (), drag to select the first three and a half lines in column 1 (up to and including the word Bella), and choose Edit > Cut.

8.
Position the insertion point at the beginning of the remaining text in column 1 (before the word Coola), and if necessary press the Backspace key to delete the letter space.

9.
With the text tool selected, drag to define a text block above the text in the left and right columns, spanning the width of the two columns (exact height is not important), and choose Edit > Paste.

No longer part of the threaded story, the pasted text is a separate story and will serve as an introductory paragraph. Once formatted with a larger font, this introductory text will serve to draw the reader's eye from the larger text into the smaller text of the proposal.

10.
Choose File > Save.

Creating and applying a style

A style is a set of character and paragraph formatting attributes. Once you define a style, you can select one or several paragraphs and apply the style. In just one step, all formatting defined for that style is applied to the text. Styles are especially useful when you repeat formatting characteristics in several places or are still experimenting with the layout of a publication.

As with other paragraph attributes, you need only an insertion point in the paragraph to apply a style. A style affects the entire paragraph, regardless of how much text is selected. However, you can override a style by selecting text within the paragraph and applying other attributes to the selected text.

PageMaker lists the styles of a publication in three different places: in the Styles palette, in the Control palette, and on the Styles submenu of the Type menu. You can apply a style to text from any of these style lists.

Earlier you specified the first line of each paragraph in the proposal text to be indented .25 inch. You'll now create a style that has no indent, so you can quickly change the formatting of select paragraphs.

1.
Make sure the insertion point is still in the pasted introductory text.

2.
In the paragraph view of the Control palette, type 0 for First-line Indent (), and press Enter or Return.

The introductory paragraph is no longer indented. To make it easier to remove the first-line indent from a few other paragraphs in this publication, you will create a style where the first line of text in a paragraph is aligned to the left edge of the text block. Once created, you will apply this style to selected paragraphs in the proposal text.

3.
With the insertion point still in the pasted introductory text, choose Type > Define Styles, and then click the New button.

4.
In the Style Options dialog box, type No Indent for Name. Hold down Shift (Windows) or Option (Macintosh), and click OK to close the dialog boxes.

The No Indent style has the type and paragraph specifications assigned to the introductory text.

5.
Click the Styles palette tab to display the Styles palette.

Collectively, a publication's styles are called a style sheet, and are listed in the Styles palette. In addition to displaying numerous default styles, the Styles palette displays the No Indent style.

You don't have to re-create styles each time you create a publication. You can copy styles from other PageMaker publications or from other word-processing applications. For more information, see the Adobe PageMaker 7.0 User Guide.


Now that you have created the No Indent style, you can apply it to the first paragraph in column 1 below the introductory text.

6.
With the text tool selected, click the first paragraph in column 1 (below the introductory text) to establish an insertion point.

Note

When applying a style to a single paragraph, you must establish an insertion point in that paragraph. When applying a style to multiple, contiguous paragraphs, you must select some text in all target paragraphs.

7.
In the Styles palette, click No Indent to apply the style to the paragraph.

Since the introductory text is meant to draw the reader's eye into the proposal text, the first paragraph of proposal text looks best without an indentation in the first line of text.

8.
Choose File > Save.

Formatting the introductory text

After formatting the introductory text, you place it in its final position on page 1.

1.
With the text tool selected, triple-click the introductory text below the title text to select it.

2.
In the Control palette, click the Force-justify button () to align the left and right edges of the text with the edges of the text block, including the last line of text.

3.
In the Control palette, click the Character-view button (). Choose AGaramond Bold for Font, type 22 for Size () and 39 for Leading (), and click the Italic button ().

Note

Because of the way fonts are defined, when you apply italic to AGaramond Bold, PageMaker actually uses AGaramond Bold Italic. On the Macintosh, you can get the same result if you select AGaramond Bold Italic directly.

4.
With the introductory text still selected, click the Colors palette tab to display the Colors palette. Make sure [Black] is selected in the Colors palette, and choose 65% for Tint to apply a 65% tint of black to the introductory text.

The formatted text is ready to be aligned.

5.
Select the pointer tool, click the introductory text to select it as a text block, hold down Shift (to constrain the movement), and drag the text block until its bottom edge snaps to the 4.17-inch horizontal ruler guide.

6.
Choose File > Save.

Placing a graphic

After placing and aligning a photograph in column 1, you will reduce the size of the text block in column 1.

1.
Scroll to view the bottom of the page.

2.
In column 2, locate the fourth line of text above the bottom margin guide. From the horizontal ruler, drag down to create a horizontal ruler guide aligned with the baseline of this line of text.

To allow for a 3-line caption, you will use this horizontal ruler guide to align the bottom edge of the photograph with the baseline of text in column 2.

Note

Unless you want to place an inline graphic (a graphic attached to text), it's a good idea to make sure the text does not contain an insertion point when importing a graphic.

3.
Select the pointer tool to ensure that the text doesn't contain an insertion point.

4.
Choose File > Place. Double-click the 03ArtA.tif file in the 03Lesson folder.

5.
With the loaded graphic icon displayed, click in column 1 to place the photograph.

Depending on where you clicked, the photograph overlaps the text in one or both columns.

6.
With the photograph still selected, drag it until its bottom edge snaps to the horizontal ruler guide you just created, with its right edge snapped to the right edge of column 1.

The photograph extends into the left margin.

With the photograph aligned, you are ready to resize the text block in column 1.

7.
With the pointer tool selected, click the text above the photograph in column 1 to select it as a text block, and drag the bottom windowshade handle to display the last line of text to be approximately one line space above the photograph.

Column 1 displays 14 lines of proposal text.

8.
Choose File > Save.

Editing the default Caption style

Once the caption text is placed below the photograph, you will edit the default Caption style and apply it to the text.

1.
Choose Layout > Autoflow to deselect it.

2.
Choose File > Place, double-click the 03TextB.doc file in the 03Lesson folder.

3.
With the loaded text icon displayed, click in column 1 below the photograph to place the text.

If a red triangle appears in the bottom windowshade handle, some of the caption remains to be placed. You will fix this later.

Since all captions in this publication will be formatted identically, you will save time by editing the existing Caption style to create a custom style. Once created, this style can be applied to each caption in your publication.

4.
Choose Type > Define Styles.

The Define Styles dialog box displays the default styles that you can apply to text. In addition to creating new styles as you have already done, you can use this dialog box to edit an existing style, creating a custom style.

5.
In the Define Styles dialog box, click Caption for Style, and click the Edit button.

6.
In the Style Options dialog box, click the Char button.

Even though you can use the character view of the Control palette to format text, the Character Specifications dialog box provides the most complete set of character-formatting options in PageMaker.

7.
In the Character Specifications dialog box, choose AGaramond Bold for Font, type 10 for Size and 13 for Leading, and then make sure Italic is selected for Type style. Hold down Shift (Windows) or Option (Macintosh), and click OK to close the dialog boxes.

8.
Select the text tool (), click the caption text under the photograph to establish an insertion point.

9.
In the Styles palette, click Caption to apply a style to the selected paragraph.

10.
Select the pointer tool, click the caption text to select it as a text block, and drag the bottom windowshade handle until the entire story is displayed. Then hold down Shift (to constrain the movement), and drag the text block until the baseline of the last line of text is aligned with the bottom margin guide.

11.
Choose File > Save.

Editing the default Subhead style

After editing the existing Subhead style to create a custom style for the subheads in this publication, you will apply it to the subhead on the first page.

1.
Choose Type > Define Styles, select Subhead 1 for Style, and click Edit.

2.
In the Style Options dialog box, click Char. Choose Myriad Roman for Font, type 11 for Size and 13 for Leading, choose Small Caps for Case, and select Bold for Type Style. To close the dialog boxes, hold down Shift (Windows) or Option (Macintosh), and click OK.

3.
Select the text tool, and click the subhead Available Space Analysis in column 2 of the first page to establish an insertion point.

4.
In the Styles palette click Subhead 1 to apply the style to the subhead text.

5.
With the text tool still selected, click the first paragraph below the subhead text you just formatted to establish an insertion point in the paragraph.

6.
In the Styles palette click No Indent to apply the custom style to the selected paragraph.

The paragraph following the subhead is no longer indented.

7.
If necessary, select the pointer tool, click the text in column 2 to select it as a text block, and drag its bottom windowshade handle down just below the margin guide so the last line of text is aligned with the bottom margin guide.

The first page is complete.

8.
Choose File > Save.

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