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Part II: Creating Basic Web Pages > Adding and Editing Drawings

Chapter 8. Adding and Editing Drawings

If you have ever used Microsoft PowerPoint to create an organization chart, you have created vector-based drawings. As bit-mapped images, GIFs and JPEGs are made of differently colored pixels. Drawings, however, are vector-based images. As mathematically generated objects, vector-based images create much smaller files than their GIF or JPEG equivalents. That means they download more quickly over the Web. But there’s a catch: only version 5 or later Web browsers can read the Vector Markup Language coding used to generate vector-based drawings.

Microsoft FrontPage includes a partial solution to this problem by also creating a GIF version of any drawing. Web browsers that cannot handle the VML code will, instead, display the substitute GIF. The problem is that the GIF file will be larger (and slower to download) than the original vector-based image. As with so many things Web, using drawings involves a trade off. Unless you’re publishing Web pages for an audience where everyone uses Internet Explorer 5, for example, you may want to think twice before packing your pages with drawings.


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