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Part III: Creating Advanced Pages > Building Style Sheets and Dynamic Effects

Chapter 14. Building Style Sheets and Dynamic Effects

Cascading Style Sheets, known as CSS, represent a leap forward for Web designers. Before CSS came along, you had much less control over the appearance and positioning of text in your Web pages. Now that version 4 and later Web browsers support CSS, it’s much easier to lay out a Web page without constantly worrying about how it looks on different computer platforms.

CSS lets you apply a set of styles across your entire Web site, which means your pages will look more consistent. It also means a whole lot less work. Want to revise a headline style? Just make the change in your external style sheet. Bam, it’s applied to the whole site. CSS is not without problems. The type formatting controls in CSS (known as CSS1) work fairly consistently in versions 4 or later of Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator. The positioning controls (CSS2) are applied less consistently. However, this is not a major problem since a browser simply ignores—rather than mangles—any CSS2 code it can’t interpret.


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