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Chapter 4. WORKING WITH OBJECTS > Applying Stroke Effects

Applying Stroke Effects

Strokes arc the effects applied to the outside of objects and along lines.

To apply a stroke:

1.
Select the object.

2.
Click the Stroke icon in the Toolbox or Color palette .

Figure 4.59. The Stroke icon in the Toolbox and Color palettes.


3.
To apply a color stroke, click the color in the Color or Swatches palette. (For more information on the Color and Swatches palettes, see Chapter 6, "Working in Color.")

You can also apply special effects using the Stroke palette.

To work with the Stroke palette:

1.
If the Stroke palette is not visible, choose Window>Stroke to view the Stroke palette .

Figure 4.60. The Stroke palette.


or

If the Stroke palette is behind other palettes, click the Stroke palette tab.

2.
To display all the stroke controls, choose Show Options from the Stroke palette pop-up menu.

The weight of the stroke is the thickness of the stroke.

To set the stroke weight (thickness):

1.
Select the object.

2.
Use the weight field controls to set the thickness of the stroke.

3.
To have the stroke weight increase the size of the bounding box, choose Weight Changes Bounding Box from the Stroke palette submenu .

Figure 4.61. When the Weight Changes Bounding Box command is chosen, increasing the stroke weight increases the size of the object.


The end caps and joins of a stroke control how the ends and points of the object are treated.

To set the caps and joins:

1.
Select an object.

2.
In the Stroke palette, use the Cap icons to change the way the ends of open paths are treated:

Figure 4.62. The Cap icons.


  • Choose Butt to end the stroke in a square shape .

    Figure 4.63. The effects of the three cap settings.

  • Choose Round to end the stroke in a semi-circle shape .

  • Choose Projecting to end the stroke in a square shape, the same size as the weight of the stroke .

Tip

The Cap settings have no effect on closed paths such as rectangles, ellipses, and polygons.


3.
Use the Join icons to change the way two segments of a path meet at corners:

Figure 4.64. The Join icons.


  • Choose Miter to join the segments at an angle .

    Figure 4.65. The effects of the three cap settings.

  • Choose Round to join the segments with a curve .

  • Choose Bevel to join the segments with a line between the segments .

Tip

The join commands affect only corner points. (For more information on the different types of points, see Chapter 5, "Pen and Béziers.")


If you set the join to the miter setting, you can control the limit of the angle created between two segments.

To set the miter limit:

1.
Select an object with a inhered join.

2.
In the Stroke palette, increase the amount in the Miter Limit field to control the size of the angle between the segments.

Tip

If the size of the angle exceeds the miter limit, a bevel is substituted .

Figure 4.66. The effect of changing the miter limit.



You can also set special styles for strokes. If a stroke is set to dashed, you can set the size of the dashes and the gaps between them.

To create dashed strokes:

1.
Select an object or objects.

2.
Choose Dashed from the Stroke Type pop-Lip menu. The dashed settings appear at the bottom of the Stroke palette .

Figure 4.67. The clashed settings in the Stroke palette.


3.
Enter an amount in the first dash field for the length of the dash.

4.
Enter an amount in the first gap field for the size of the space between the dashes.

5.
To create different series of dashes and gaps, enter other values in the rest of the dash and gap fields .

Figure 4.68. Various effects can he created using the dash and gap fields.


Tip

Apply round caps to create round ends for the dashes .

Figure 4.69. The effect of using the round cap on the dash settings.



InDesign 1.5 lets you apply special stripe styles to strokes .

Figure 4.70. The six stripe styles


To apply stripe styles to strokes:

1.
Select an object.

2.
Choose one of the stripe styles from the Stroke Type pop-up menu.

Tip

Use the Stroke Weight field to increase or decrease the size of the stripe.


Tip

The gap between the stripes is always clear, not white.


You can also add arrowheads and other end shapes to the end of lines and open paths .

Figure 4.71. The built-in arrowheads and end shapes.


To add arrowheads and end shapes:

1.
Select an object.

2.
Add a graphic to the beginning of the object, by choosing a shape from the Start pop-up list in the Stroke palette .

Figure 4.72. The Arrow shapes pop-up list.


3.
Add a graphic to the end of the object, by choosing a shape from the End popup list.

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