• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 7. Fonts and Encodings > 7.2. Understanding font characteristics

7.2. Understanding font characteristics

There are many design principles that divide fonts into individual overlapping classes. Knowledge of these characteristics often proves helpful when deciding which font family to use in a special context (for further reading see, for example, the books [28, 41, 116] or the article [52]).

7.2.1. Monospaced and proportional fonts

Fonts can be either monospaced or proportionally spaced. In a monospaced font, each individual character takes up the same horizontal space regardless of its shape. In contrast, characters in a proportionally spaced font take up different amounts of space depending on their shape. In Figure 7.1 on the following page, you can see that the “i” of the monospaced font occupies the same space as the “m”, while it is noticeably narrower in the proportional font. As a result, proportional fonts (also called typographical fonts) normally allow more words to be placed on a page and are more readable than monospaced fonts. The extra spaces around individual characters of monospaced fonts make it more difficult for the eye to recognize word boundaries and thus make monospaced text less readable.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint