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Chapter 8. A Post-ARG Analysis > Real-World and Virtual Interactions

Real-World and Virtual Interactions

If you read through the chapters (2, 3, and 4, respectively) on the Beast and Art of the Heist ARGs, you know that both of these games presented elements that allowed the game and its players to cross the boundary between the real and virtual worlds. Either through phone calls, faxes, e-mails, or staged events, both of these ARGs allowed the gaming experience to move beyond the computer monitor screen and into a new type of cyber-reality that included elements of the physical world.

The sample Route 66 ARG was obviously limited in its ability to make as deep of a jump out of the virtual and into the physical. While this might come as a surprise, writing a book like this, while incredibly enjoyable and fulfilling, does not bring with it the kind of resources that a Microsoft, DreamWorks Studios, or Audi can provide to those people who are designing ARGs that revolve around their products. Admittedly, this question raises the interesting issue of, and I’m coining a phrase here, “the poor man’s ARG” versus the massively produced, resource-intensive ARG like The Art of the Heist. Which one is better or more enjoyable, and which one is truer in spirit to the central focus of alternate reality gaming?


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