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Chapter 22. Upsizing Jet Applications to... > In the Real World—Strategic or Not?

In the Real World—Strategic or Not?

ADP and SQL Server represent Microsoft strategic migration path to client/server applications. Only those technologies that Microsoft deems strategic receive significant development funding. As an example, when Microsoft decided in 1998 that SQL Server was its strategic database, Jet development ground to an immediate halt with the release of Access 2000. Jet 4.0 is the end of the line for this venerable database engine, other than for Windows CE developers. (The Windows CE version of SQL Server is based on Jet technology.)

Similarly, Data Access Objects (DAO) and Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) aren’t strategic; DAO is terminal at version 3.6 and, when this book was written, the last update to the ODBC page on Microsoft’s Web site (http://www.microsoft.com/data/odbc/default.htm) was March 17, 1999. Microsoft Data Access Components (MDAC), which include ActiveX Data Objects (ADO) and OLE DB, are strategic, but not as strategic as .NET. Office 2003 installs MDAC 2.7. You can expect MDAC to receive a few updates, whereas Jet, DAO, and ODBC languish in maintenance-only purgatory. Most of Microsoft’s data connectivity efforts are directed to the .NET Framework and Visual Studio .NET.



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