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Chapter 30. Understanding Universal Data... > Taking Advantage of Disconnected Rec...

Taking Advantage of Disconnected Recordsets

If you set the value of the Recordset’s LockEdits property to adBatchOptimistic and the CursorType property to adKeyset or adStatic, you create a batch-type Recordset object that you can disconnect from the data source. You can then edit the Recordset object offline with a client-side cursor, reopen the Connection object, and send the updates to the data source over the new connection. A Recordset without an active connection is called a disconnected Recordset. The advantage of a disconnected Recordset is that you eliminate the need for an active server connection during extended editing sessions. Batch updates solve the Access front-end scalability issues mentioned at the beginning of the chapter.

Note

Unfortunately, you can’t assign a disconnected Recordset to the Recordset property of a form or subform and take advantage of batch updates. Bound forms require an active connection to the database. You must write VBA code to handle updating, adding, and deleting records.

To learn more about updatability issues with disconnected Recordsets and the Client Data Manager (CDM) added by Access 2002, open Microsoft Knowledge Base article Q301987, “Using ADO in Microsoft Access 2002” and download the white paper.



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