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Chapter 21. Moving from Jet Queries to T... > Understanding the Role of SQL in Acc...

Understanding the Role of SQL in Access 2003

This chapter describes Structured Query Language (SQL), the grammar of the language, and SQL Server’s dialect of ANSI-92 SQL called Transact-SQL (T-SQL). Earlier chapters have demonstrated how Access translates queries you build in its Query Design view into Jet SQL statements. Jet SQL is another SQL dialect that closely resembles T-SQL, but Jet SQL lacks T-SQL’s support for views and its extensions for functions, stored procedures, and linked servers. Jet SQL is unique in its support for VBA functions—such as CCur() and DatePart()—in queries. T-SQL has equivalents to many VBA functions, but the usage syntax differs.

SQL (usually pronounced “sequel” or “seekel,” but more properly “ess-cue-ell”) is the common language of client/server database management. The principal advantage of SQL is that it’s standardized—you can use a common set of SQL statements with all SQL-compliant database-management systems. The first U.S. SQL standard was established in 1986 as ANSI X3.135-1986. The current version is ANSI X3.135-1992, usually known as SQL-92. ANSI is an acronym for the American National Standards Institute. X3.135 is the code name for the ANSI subcommittee that’s responsible for editing and publishing SQL standards documentation. The corresponding International Standards Organization (ISO) standard is ISO/IEC 9075:1992.


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