• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 31. Consuming and Providing XML ... > In the Real World—Why Web Services A...

In the Real World—Why Web Services Are Important

The introduction to this chapter observed that Web services were in the “early adopter” stage when Microsoft released Office 2003. Most organizations’ information technology (IT) groups are conducting internal pilot deployments of Web services for enterprise application integration (EAI) projects. EIA is a catch-all term for making packaged and custom software from multiple vendors—often running under different operating systems—communicate with one another. EIA consumes much of the programming effort and IT budgets of medium to large organizations. Web services promise to reduce EIA costs dramatically by breaking away from proprietary interapplication communication methods and moving to standards-based messaging with XML and SOAP.

Business-to-business (B2B) communication over the Internet is another promising application for Web services. The first commercial B2B Web service implementations are likely to involve supply-chain management (SCM). SCM enables organizations to automate purchasing and contracting operations with “business partners.” Many standards bodies are involved in establishing a common XML vocabulary for B2B services. OASIS’s electronic business XML (ebXML) is an example of a standardized XML business document format intended to replace costly and complex Electronic Document Interchange (EDI) programs with XML Web services.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint