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Chapter 14. SQL Server Integration > Exploring Your Northwind Project

Exploring Your Northwind Project

As mentioned earlier, it would take another book for a comprehensive analysis of SQL Server. Therefore, this chapter is just an overview. Even so, you get a taste of what is available to you if you take the time to explore the features of Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine. Actually, the engine has some very basic administrative tools, such as backup, restore, drop, copy, transfer, and SQL security. However, a project’s development features are not part of MSDE 2000 at all, but part of Microsoft Access. The bottom line is that, by using an Access project (ADP), you can build client/server applications including triggers, stored procedures, views, transaction logging, rollbacks, and so on, whether you use MSDE 2000 or a full copy of the SQL Server 2000.

Try to separate in your mind the data in a project from the objects that process the data. The files that contain data (or data definitions) reside in a separate file with an .mdf extension. For example, the data file for the Northwind sample file is called NorthwindCS.mdf. The Northwind sample project file is called NorthwindCS.adp. It contains the user interface objects such as forms, reports, data access pages, macros, and modules. There is no need to worry. You can work with the data objects as if they were stored in the Access project file. Table 14.1 compares objects in an Access database and objects in an Access project.


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