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Chapter 28. Understanding Universal Data... > In the Real World—Why Learn ADO Prog...

In the Real World—Why Learn ADO Programming?

As observed in Chapter 2, “Exploring Relational Database Theory and Practice,” “Everything has to be somewhere” is a popular corollary of the Law of Conservation of Matter. So, just about everything you need to know about ADO 2.x is concentrated in this chapter. The problem with this “laundry list” approach to describing a set of data-related objects is that readers are likely to doze off in mid-chapter. If you've gotten this far (and have at least scanned the intervening code and tables), you probably surmised that ADO is more than just a replacement for DAO—it's a relatively new and expanding approach to database connectivity.

The most important reason to become an accomplished ADO programmer is to create Web-based database applications. Microsoft designed OLE DB and ADO expressly for HTML- and XML-based applications, such as DAP—the subject of the three chapters of Part VI, “Publishing Data to Intranets and the Internet.” You can use VBScript or JScript (Microsoft's variant of JavaScript) to open and manipulate ADO Connection, Command, and Recordset objects on Web pages. With DAO, you're stuck with conventional Access applications that require users to have a copy of Office XP or you to have the Microsoft Office XP Developer Edition (MOD 10) so you can supply runtime versions of your Access 2002 applications.


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