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Using Access to Learn SQL

Structured Query Language, abbreviated SQL (usually pronounced "sequel" or "seekel," but more properly "ess-cue-ell"), is the common language of client/server database management. The principal advantage of SQL is that it's standardized—you can use a common set of SQL statements with all SQL-compliant database management systems. The first U.S. SQL standard was established in 1986 as ANSI X3.135-1986. The current version is ANSI X3.135-1992, usually known as SQL-92. ANSI is an acronym for the American National Standards Institute.

SQL is an application language for relational databases, not a system or programming language. SQL is a set-oriented language; thus ANSI SQL includes neither a provision for program flow control (branching and looping) nor keywords to create data-entry forms and print reports. Some implementations of SQL, such as Transact-SQL used by Microsoft SQL Server, add flow control statements (IF…ELSE and WHILE) to the language. Publishers of ANSI SQL-compliant RDBMSs are free to extend the language if the basic ANSI commands are supported.


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