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Chapter 9. Understanding Query Operators... > Writing Expressions for Query Criter...

Writing Expressions for Query Criteria and Data Validation

Chapter 5, "Entering, Editing, and Validating Data in Tables," briefly introduced you to operators and the expressions that use them when you added validation rules to table fields. Chapter 8, "Designing Access Queries," touched on expressions again when you devised selection criteria for the query that you created. You must use expressions with the forms (Chapter 12, "Creating and Using Forms," and Chapter 13, "Designing Custom Multitable Forms"); reports (Chapter 14, "Printing Basic Reports and Mailing Labels," and Chapter 15, "Preparing Advanced Reports"); and queries (Chapter 8 and Chapter 10, "Creating Multitable and Crosstab Queries") that you combine when creating custom Access applications. Furthermore, you use expressions extensively when programming with Access VBA (Chapters 26 through 30). To work effectively with Access, therefore, you must know how to create simple expressions that use Access's group of functions and operators.

If you use Microsoft Excel, you might be familiar with employing operators to create expressions. In spreadsheet applications, expressions are called formulas. As discussed in Chapter 4, "Working with Access Databases and Tables," the syntax for expressions that create default values, such as =Date + 28, is similar to formula entries in Excel. Conditional expressions that use the =IIF function in Excel use the IIf function in Access.


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