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Chapter 25. Creating Access Data Projects > In the Real World—ADP on Trial

In the Real World—ADP on Trial

The jury's out on ADP version 1.0 as a production database front end to MSDE back end databases. MSDE's lack of Enterprise Manager tools make ordinary database administration chores difficult or impossible. As an example, the Tools, Database Utilities, Drop SQL Database command simply disconnects ADP from the back-end database; the command doesn't delete the database. If you have an SQL Server 7.0 installation, you can use Enterprise Manager to administer MSDE, but only if it's running under Windows NT or 2000. You can't connect Enterprise Manager to MSDE under Windows 9x, because Windows 9x doesn't support the required Named Pipes protocol. Most MSDE users probably will migrate to SQL Server 7.0 when putting ADP into production, fulfilling Microsoft's objective in providing MSDE with Access 2000.

ADP Drawbacks

ADP offers no equivalent of locally stored Jet QueryDef objects; the server stores all queries as views or stored procedures. This approach is the opposite of that taken by Access's Database Splitter utility, which retains QueryDefs in the front-end .mdb file. It's logical to store queries that are common to many applications and users on the server, but application- or user-specific queries belong on the client side. As you increase the number of ADP queries, the database becomes bloated with views and stored procedures that clients execute only occasionally, if at all. Hopefully, the next version of ADP will provide a local QueryDef storage mechanism.


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