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Chapter 1. Access 2000 for Access 95 and... > In the Real World—Why Upgrade?

In the Real World—Why Upgrade?

Note

At the end of each chapter of this book is an "In the Real World" section. The objective of these sections is to provide insight on how the material in the chapter relates to the real world of production database design and implementation with Access 2000. Like this chapter's "In the Real World," many of these sections include "op-ed" (opinion-editorial) style comments on the significance (or lack of significance) of new Access features, as well as advice based on first-hand experience with production Access applications installed by Fortune 100 firms.


Several years ago, Bill Gates described Microsoft's "subscription model" for productivity and other software products. The idea was to stabilize Microsoft's revenue stream by charging a fixed annual fee, based on the original software license price, for application and operating system upgrades. The obvious problem with such an approach is that many Microsoft products experience major-scale release date slippage. Unlike a monthly magazine subscription, which results in 12 issues arriving per year, you might not receive a full version upgrade in a year's software subscription. The most obvious current example is Windows 2000 (neé Windows NT 5.0), which Microsoft originally scheduled for retail release in 1998. Industry pundits currently predict that Windows 2000 will find its way to retailers' shelves during its eponymous year.


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