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Chapter 25. Publishing Data on the Web > Maintaining Static Web Pages

Maintaining Static Web Pages

The Web pages you’ve seen thus far in this chapter are static—once you publish a page like these to a Web server, the information doesn’t change until you replace or edit the text. Actually, static Web pages are the most common type of page you’ll find on any noncommercial site on the Web. All the pages at the W3C Web site (http://www.w3.org) and all the pages on my Web site (http://www.viescas.com) are static. So, you won’t see any new information on my Web site unless I edit and update the pages.

To understand how static Web pages work (and the way the Web works in general), you need to know a bit about the architecture of the Web. Like all network applications, the World Wide Web defines two roles computers can play: client or server. (Sometimes, a single computer can serve both roles.) The client software, called a browser, requests files from the server and displays them on the client computer. The server software, called a Web server, accepts requests from browsers and transmits the requested files to the browser. Figure 25-5 provides a highly simplified diagram of these components.


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