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Chapter 24. Creating Your Own Libraries > Why This Chapter Is Important

Why This Chapter Is Important

As your knowledge of the VBA language expands and you become more proficient as a VBA programmer, you probably will develop functions and subroutines that you would like all your databases to share. Without the use of library databases, the code in each of your databases is an island unto itself. Although you can call the functions and subroutines within your code modules from anywhere in the same database, you cannot call these procedures from a different database.

Without a shared library of code and other standard objects, you will find yourself copying routines and other database objects from one database to the next. All the applications you build can use the library databases that you create. You can distribute your library databases to all your users. A library database is just like any other database; it is simply a collection of procedures and objects that you want to share among numerous databases. The only difference between the library database and other databases is in the way that your application references the database. Instead of opening a library database to use it, you reference it from another database.


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