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Chapter 1. A Strategy for Developing Acc... > Splitting Databases into Tables and ...

Splitting Databases into Tables and Other Objects

When earlier versions of Access ran in a multiuser environment, it was imperative to place the system's tables in one database and the rest of the system objects in another database. With Access 95 and the advent of replication, you could either split the tables from the other objects or use replication to deploy design changes without comprising live data. Access 2000 and Access 2002 take this a step further with the Access Data Project (ADP), in which tables, views, stored procedures, and data diagrams are stored in a SQL Server database or by the SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine (formerly the Microsoft Data Engine, or MSDE). Forms, reports, macros, and modules are stored in the ADP file.

As mentioned earlier, splitting tables from other system objects is still a very viable solution. For simplicity, I'll refer to the database containing the tables as the Table database and the database with the other objects as the Application database. Linking from the Application database to the Table database connects the two databases. This strategy enhances the following:


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