• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Assessing Your Responses: Where You Stand in Relation to Other E-Mail Users

Assessing Your Responses: Where You Stand in Relation to Other E-Mail Users

The following information will tell how you, as an e-mail user, compare with others who are sending and receiving electronic messages in the workplace.

  1. Although 86% of employees send and receive personal e-mail at work,[2] you may be violating your employer’s e-mail policy if you do so. Do not risk disciplinary action or termination. Read, understand, and comply with your organization’s e-mail policy.

    [2] Elron Software, 1999 E-Mail Abuse Study. Available online at www.elronsoftware.com.

  2. Most employers take one of three approaches to personal e-mail: (1) all personal e-mail is banned; (2) a limited amount of personal e-mail is allowed, provided it falls within established guidelines; or (3) personal use is permitted, but only after normal business hours. Play it safe. Do not write personal e-mail messages until you know exactly where your employer stands on the issue.

  3. According to a survey conducted by the American Management Association, US News & World Report, and The ePolicy Institute, 81% of employers have a written e-mail policy.[3] Chances are your employer has one too. If that is news to you, contact your human resources director or chief information officer and ask for a written copy of your organization’s e-mail policy.

    [3] American Management Association. US News & World Report, ePolicy Institute 2001 Survey of Electronic Policies and Practices. Survey results available at www.epolicyinstitute.com.

  4. The Wall Street Journal reports the average office worker spends 49 minutes a day e-mailing, while top management spends about four hours a day sending, receiving, and reading e-mail.[4] How do you compare?

    [4] Weinstein, “Help! I’m Drowning in E-Mail!”

  5. An effective e-mail management strategy can help save you from drowning in e-mail. E-mail management techniques for individuals and organizations are provided in Part VI of this book.

  6. E-mail is a cold medium. Without the benefit of intonation, facial expression, or body language, it is easy for e-mail writers to offend or irritate readers. Before clicking Send, objectively assess the message’s tone and content. If the reader could misinterpret or be offended by your message, rewrite it.

  7. More than 46% of U.S. employers have disciplined or terminated employees for e-mailing sexually suggestive or explicit material. Another 28% have disciplined or terminated employees for sending menacing, harassing, discriminatory, or otherwise objectionable e-mail. And 51% of employers have disciplined or terminated workers for violating e-policy.[5]

    [5] American Management Association, 2001 Survey of Electronic Policies and Practices.

  8. Research shows 60% of employees engage in adult-oriented e-mail at work, and 55% send or receive politically incorrect or otherwise offensive e-mail at work.[6] Doing so places employees at risk of disciplinary action or termination and sets up their employers for legal claims.

    [6] Elron Software, 1999 E-Mail Abuse Study.

  9. True. In fact, nearly 10% of employers have been ordered by courts to produce employee e-mail in the course of workplace lawsuits. Another 10% have defended claims of sexual or racial harassment or discrimination based on employee e-mail use.[7]

    [7] American Management Association, 2001 Survey of Electronic Policies and Practices.

  10. True. Reduce the likelihood of customer complaints, termination, lawsuits, and other e-disasters by composing well-written, compelling e-mail messages free of offensive, harassing, discriminatory, obscene, menacing, threatening, hostile, or otherwise objectionable language.

  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint