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Part: ONE The Work of Making Things > Triggers and Practice

Chapter THREE. Triggers and Practice

Artists, writers, poets, software developers, software designers, software architects, pattern writers, presentation writers, marketing people, documentation and manual writers, people—such as managers and other leaders—who create and nurture communities, web designers, interface designers, and lots of other people have something essential in common: They make things under risk. At some point an individual works alone, if even for only a short period, and the work is then revealed and can be judged. How can we create a context in which taking risks like this isn't so scary?

I want to make a distinction between risky making and repetitive making.[7] In repetitive making, a mostly predetermined amount of work of a definite sort produces a mostly predictable result. In risky making, failure is a possibility. In both cases, the results might be disappointing, but only in risky making is there the real possibility of complete failure.


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