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Chapter 6. Sentence Sense > Sorry Sentences - Pg. 64

Sentence Sense 64 Parallel structure means putting ideas of the same rank in the same grammatical form. You can have parallel words, phrases, clauses, and even sentences. Here are two more examples: Not parallel: Parallel: Not parallel: Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the triumph will be even more glorious. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph (from "The American Crisis," by Thomas Paine). Whether expressed in a sit-in at lunch counters, a freedom ride in Mississippi, a peaceful protest in Georgia, or if we boycott buses in Montgomery, Alabama, it is an outgrowth of Thoreau's insistence that evil must be resisted and no moral man can patiently adjust to injustice. Whether expressed in a sit-in at lunch counters, a freedom ride in Mississippi, a peaceful protest in Georgia, or a bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama, it is an outgrowth of Thoreau's insistence that evil must be resisted and no moral man can patiently adjust to injustice (from "A Legacy of Creative Protest," by Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.). Parallel: Variety Is the Spice of Life (and Writing!) Who can eat the same meal every day, watch the same shows, and wear the same clothes? (Don't answer that.) Variety makes life--and sentences--interesting. Effective writing uses sentences of different lengths and types to create variety and interest. Craft your sentences to express your ideas in the best possible way. Start by varying the length of your sentences. The unbroken rhythm of the same length sentences can lull a reader into unconscious- ness. Sorry Sentences