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Chapter 6. Sentence Sense > I Know It When I See It - Pg. 58

Sentence Sense 58 Word Watch A sentence is a group of words with two main parts: a subject and a predicate. Together, these parts express a complete thought. A subject is the noun or pronoun that names the person, place, or thing that tells what the sentence is about. A predicate includes a verb that tells what the subject is or does. I Know It When I See It You've met a lot of sentences in your life. You've written a lot, too. So you know a sentence when you see it, but could you explain what exactly makes a sentence a sentence and not, say, a sand- wich, sandcastle, or space shuttle? To be a sentence, a group of words must ... 1. 2. 3. Have a subject (noun or pronoun). Have a predicate (verb or verb phrase). Express a complete thought. Here are some examples: Not a sentence: Sentence: Not a sentence: Sentence: Not a sentence: Sentence: Zooms out of your mouth at over 600 m.p.h. (missing a subject) A sneeze zooms out of your mouth at over 600 m.p.h. More people killed annually by donkeys than die in air crashes. (missing a complete verb) More people are killed annually by donkeys than die in air crashes. Because every person has a unique tongue print. (not a complete thought) Every person has a unique tongue print. Superb Sentences Given the wide variety of writing styles, it's surprising that all effective sentences share the exact same qualities: They are clear, complete, and correct. But maybe these qualities are not so sur- prising when you recall that every sentence you write is designed to communicate your ideas. The best way to do that is by giving your readers the information you want to convey in a form they will understand and enjoy. To write great sentences, remember these three points: Write Angles