Share this Page URL
Help

Part: 6 Picture Perfect > Term Paper #2 - Pg. 346

Sample Term Papers 346 Bibliography "Bach, Johann Sebastian." Encyclopedia Britannica . vol I. 15 ed. "Bach, Johann Sebastian." Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia . vol 3. 1983 ed. R. Barr, "Zelter, Carl Friedrich." The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians . vol 20. Ed. StanleySadie. London: Macmillan Publishers Limited, 1980. "Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von." Encyclopedia Britannica . vol IV. 15 ed. G. W. Harris, "Felix Mendelssohn." The International Cyclopedia of Music and Musicians . Ed. Os- carThompson. New York: Dodd, Mead Inc., 1985. Karl-Heinz Kohler,. "Mendelssohn, Felix." The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians . vol 12. Ed. StanleySadie. London: Macmillan Publishers Limited, 1980. "Mendelssohn, Felix." Encyclopedia Britannica . vol 11. 15 ed. "Mendelssohn, Felix." Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia . vol 3. 1983 ed. Hannsdieter Wohlfarth,. Johann Sebastian Bach . Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1984. "Zelter, Carl Friedrich." Encyclopedia Britannica . vol X. 15 ed. Term Paper #2 The Effects of Calorie Restriction on Aging by Jessica Swantek Introduction For ages, humans have been searching for ways to counteract the aging process. The legendary fountain of youth generated much attention in the past, and more recently, thousands of dollars have been spent each year on creams, pills, plastic surgery, and various forms of therapy designed to make one look and feel younger. So far nothing has been proven to reverse or even retard human aging, but scientists are finally catching a glimpse as to a dietary manipulation technique that might work. Preliminary Experimentation In the 1930s, Clive McCay, a scientist at the laboratories at Cornell University, experimented on his rats by feeding them less than they would ordinarily take for themselves, but without depriving them of nutrition to the point of starvation. He found that the food-deprived rats lived considerably longer than expected for a standard rat's life span, and about 33 percent longer than his control group of rats, which were fed as much as they wanted to eat (Weindruch 46). McCay didn't fully understand his results, and although published, they were generally disregarded by the science world ( Man Immortal). Years later, Roy Walford, a nutritionist working at the University of California at Los Angeles Medical Center, came across the documentation of McCay's experiments, and, using modern technology and mice instead of rats, picked up where McCay had left off ( Man Immortal ).