• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

The Five Basic Truths

Myriad publications by a host of respected presenters offer advice about delivering effective presentations. All this advice, though, can be distilled down to five basic truths about giving presentations:

  • Truth Number 1: There is no one way to make a presentation. Think of the elements of your presentation on a continuum. On one end are things you should definitely be doing. On the other end are things you probably should not do. It’s the middle where the freedom lies to pick and choose what you believe will work best for you and your audience. In this book you’ll have a look at what works, what doesn’t, and ways to make wise choices about all the things between.

  • Truth Number 2: You know more than your audience. In most instances this is true. There may be instances when someone in your audience knows as much—or even more—about your subject than you do. Rather than feel threatened, seasoned presenters take advantage of this situation by recognizing the great wealth of knowledge and experience that exists in the room and by using other experts as allies to support what they are presenting.

    Think About This

    Feeling threatened by so-called experts in your audience can have a detrimental effect on your performance. And, looking threatened is even worse. Although it’s easy to feel intimidated, you’ll gain more credibility with your audience when you show enough confidence to allow other experts in your audience to express their thoughts and opinions about a subject.


  • Truth Number 3: There are “need to knows,” and there are “nice to knows.” Good presenters focus on need-to-know information and understand that because the audience can only absorb so much information, it should be that which offers the most benefit.

  • Truth Number 4: Making a presentation is not a science; it’s an art. With any form of art there are different ways an artist can interpret his or her subject, all of which may be valid. What’s most important is that the interpretation makes a connection with those experiencing it. It’s the same thing with a presentation. Two presenters can approach a topic in different ways and still achieve their purpose and meet their audiences’ needs. So, treat your presentation as your art and a way of expressing yourself and leave science in the lab.

  • Truth 5: The best presentations are those you are passionate about. Having a passion for what you do is the best elixir for any butterflies you might have as you stand before your audience. Passion is expressed in many ways, from the exuberance on your face, to the skip in your step, to the conviction in your voice. Passionate presentations help create passionate learners.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint