• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 11. Customizing Your Presentation > The Illusion of the First Time

The Illusion of the First Time

Many business presentations contain information that must be conveyed repeatedly, to multiple audiences. For example, a salesperson may have to present a new product to many different groups of customers; or, a human resources manager may have to explain the new company benefits plan to dozens of small groups of employees. In the IPO road show world, company officers must make their presentations to many, many groups of investors. Typically, they give 60 to 80 pitches over a period of two to three weeks, often six to eight presentations in any given day.

Under these circumstances, it's difficult to keep your presentation fresh and vital. In part, this is a matter of energy and focus. When you have to make the same points for the third, or tenth, or fiftieth time, it's hard to feel the same sense of enthusiasm, spontaneity, and excitement as the first time. It's all too easy to become bored with your presentation and let your attention flag. When you go into autopilot, however, your presentation comes across as “mailed in,” and the result is an audience that is uninvolved, unmoved, and unconvinced.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint