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Chapter 14. Time to Outline > Outline Rules - Pg. 112

Time to Outline 112 No-No I. Noise pollution comes from many sources. A. Music blasts into headphones. B. Music in clubs assaults the senses. C. Lawn mowers and leaf-blowers roar. Jackhammers and other construction tools blast. Noise pollution occurs in many large cities. A. Noise pollution occurs during leisure time. B. Radios blare. C. Cars and buses honk their horns. II. III. Speech of the Devil Beware of following an outline too slavishly, for an outline can limit a writer's options. For example, an outline can prevent a writer from discovering the material's organic unity or from making choices that might improve the speech. An outline may also divert you from focusing on audience and purpose. Yes-Yes I. Noise pollution comes from many sources. A. Noise pollution occurs in many large cities. 1. Jackhammers and other construction tools blast. 2. Radios blare. 3. Cars and buses honk their horns. B. Noise pollution occurs during leisure time. 1. Music blasts into headphones. 2. Music in clubs assaults the senses. 3. Lawn mowers and leaf-blowers roar. Indent Lines to Show the Relationship of Items Each succeeding level of the outline should show more specific detail than the one before it. The more important an idea is, the closer it will be to the left margin. Traditionally, main ideas are flush left, subheads are indented 5 spaces, and subdivisions are indented 10 spaces. If an outline entry is longer than one line, the second line should be indented as far as the first word of the preceding line. Study this template: Thesis statement: IV. Main idea A. First subordinate idea 1. Supporting evidence 2. Supporting evidence