• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

The way you sound

If looking your best is important, sounding your best may be even more so. Most of us can never hope to have a voice as rich as that of James Earl Jones, Julie Andrews, or Richard Burton. But most of us can improve our voice and thus our speaking image. Those professionals underwent many years of training to develop their voices to the point that they could project from a stage to a large audience. Every speaker, however, should be aware of how much a good voice, properly used, can add to the effectiveness of a speech.

Audiences draw conclusions from the speaker's voice. A person with a soft voice may be assumed to be timid; a high-pitched voice may mark the speaker as effeminate; a strong, deep voice is associated with masculinity or authority. These impressions aren't necessarily accurate. In the movie The Untouchables, the little guy playing the FBI accountant had a high-pitched, almost whiny voice. But when the chips were down, when the law officers came up against Al Capone's mobsters, the accountant was a tiger. His courage almost put even Eliot Ness to shame. Accurate or not, the impressions an audience gains from a speaker's voice are significant.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint