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Chapter Eleven. Get Personal

Chapter Eleven. Get Personal

We have covered similes, analogies, and metaphors—three different but related rhetorical devices that speech writers often use to illustrate points by comparing one thing to another. We've discussed quotations—why they're effective, where to find them, and how to use them. The discussion of quotations is one of my favorite parts of this book. I love quotations. I enjoy browsing in a book of quotations, and I collect quotations. When I read or hear something I like, I jot it down and drop it in a file. If you write or deliver speeches, that's a good practice to adopt.

I also enjoy anecdotes, which to a speech writer are almost as useful as quotations. An anecdote is a short, factual, interesting, and often amusing narrative concerning a particular incident or person. The word anecdote comes from the Greek anekdota, which originally meant ''unpublished.'' That's not necessarily the case today. Many anecdotes, especially about well-known people, are published and are readily available for use by speech writers.


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