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Review questions

1: When identifying the client’s needs, should you study the client’s situation?
  1. No, you don’t need to worry about studying the client’s situation.

  2. Studying the client’s situation is one of the first steps when writing a proposal.

  3. You should try studying the client’s situation, but it should not be one of your top priorities.

  4. Occasionally, you should study the client’s situation.

2: When identifying a client’s questions, should you list the questions that the client provides?
  1. Rarely you should list the client-provided questions.

  2. You should never identify the client’s questions before starting to write.

  3. Listing the client’s questions is key to writing an effective proposal.

3: Should you consider the client’s knowledge base when planning a proposal?
  1. You should usually consider the client’s knowledge base, but not always.

  2. Yes, you should consider the client’s knowledge base when planning a proposal.

  3. No, you shouldn’t consider the client’s knowledge base when planning a proposal.

4: Should you also consider the client’s role in the company?
  1. You should sometimes think about the client’s role in the company, but not always.

  2. Yes, you should always think about the client’s role in the company.

  3. No, you shouldn’t consider the client’s role in the company.

5: Should you consider the client’s level of technical knowledge?
  1. Yes, you should consider the client’s level of technical knowledge.

  2. No, you shouldn’t think about the client’s level of technical knowledge.

  3. Occasionally, you should think about the client’s level of technical knowledge, but not always.

6: Should you use “you” statements in your proposals?
  1. You should try to write in formal language and avoid “you” statements.

  2. You should always try to include “you” statements in your proposals.

7: Should you leave the technical jargon out of your proposals, or should you emphasize it to show your knowledge of the subject?
  1. Technical jargon helps demonstrate your knowledge, so you should use it whenever you can.

  2. You should usually avoid technical jargon in proposals, but include it occasionally so the client knows that you understand the plan.

  3. You should avoid using technical jargon in your proposals.

  4. It varies a great deal. You should use technical jargon when you feel it is appropriate, but you shouldn’t use it unnecessarily.

8: Should you support your claims with specific evidence?
  1. You should never make a claim without providing evidence to support it.

  2. You should provide evidence for only some of your claims.

  3. You shouldn’t worry about providing specific evidence for your claims. The client should trust you on the specifics.

9: In your proposals, should you attack your competition?
  1. You should never attack the competition in a proposal.

  2. Actually, it depends on the situation. Sometimes, if you don’t like the competition, you might attack them.

  3. You should attack your competition if you think doing it will show the strength of your proposal.

  4. When you write proposals, make it a point to attack the competition.

10: Should you work to keep your proposals direct and concise?
  1. You should make your proposals long and complicated so the client knows that you’ve done research.

  2. You should always be direct and concise when writing a proposal.

11: Should you adapt your writing style to each client?
  1. You should change your writing style for each client, but not always.

  2. You should only change your writing style for important proposals.

  3. No, you should always use the same style.

  4. Yes, you should change your writing style for each client.




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