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Chapter 5. Lots of Commas in Real Estate > Activity A. Language Arts Recall

Activity A. Language Arts Recall

Sentence Structure: Compound Sentence

A compound sentence has two or more independent clauses that are connected by a coordinating conjunction (and, or, but, nor).

As you learned in Chapter 1, an independent clause consists of a subject and a verb with its modifiers. The independent clause must make sense grammatically.

Comma–Conjunction

Rule 5.1:

Use a comma before a conjunction that joins two independent clauses.

Example: The application must be completed by the borrower, and it will be processed as soon as it is received.

Rule 5.2:

When a subject does not follow the conjunction, no comma is needed.

Example: The application blank must be completed by the borrower and returned within ten days. (The subject is missing after the conjunction “and.”)

Rule 5.3:

When the conjunction “and” is followed by the word “that,” do not place a comma before the conjunction unless the word “that” is the subject of the clause.

Example: The real estate broker believed the property was priced at market value and that a sale would occur shortly. The mortgage was approved by the bank, and that expedited the closing date for the house. (The word “that” is the subject.)


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