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Chapter 13. Solving Problems Through Ora... > Planning the Text for an Oral Presen...

Planning the Text for an Oral Presentation

Speakers can prepare, do research, discriminate among pieces of information for proper emphasis, and practice the talk, but if the text of the presentation is not well organized and does not highlight the important points, the talk will not be effective. Leah's college instructor thought of a well-organized text in terms of a basic three-course meal: the appetizer, the main course, and finally, the dessert (see Figure 13.2). The appetizer is supposed to whet the pallet, get the juices flowing, and interest the diner in what's to come. The main course is supposed to put things together—tastes and textures and colors—so that the substance of the meal is interesting and satisfying. Finally, the dessert caps it all off—a complement to what has come before, a suggestion, perhaps, of what is to come in the future. Leah agreed that the formula for a good meal was the same as one for a good presentation.

Figure 13.2. Comparison of menu topics and presentation topics



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