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Audience

Realizing that a problem is not solved until others know about it and understand and approve it, Mary Anne began to analyze her audiences more fully. Mary Anne thought that the question of who her audiences were seemed simple. After all, she could name her audiences easily enough: Tim Sanford, John Springer, Janice Trippling, and perhaps several other people at the capitol building who were in positions either superior or subordinate to Janice's but who were, for some reason, vitally interested. But as she began to think of who those audiences actually were—to think beyond names to the people themselves—she remembered that she had been in this situation before: she had had to solve problems that multiple audiences would be concerned with, in sometimes distinctly different or sometimes only subtly different ways. She knew that those concerns would be dependent in part on the audiences' backgrounds, education, experience, and positions in the structural setup. Moreover, she knew that she would have to take them all into account, which made the seemingly simple task something less than simple.

She began, then, the more detailed analysis of who her audiences were and what kind of information she had to give them by asking questions at two levels. The first level concerned the purposes she had for writing; the second concerned the specific knowledge that the audiences required about the situation.


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