• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

Those Personal Factors

Each of us is unique. We all possess certain qualities, ways of thinking, and so forth that help determine how we see the world and what we do with our lives. To understand fully our own self-leadership practices, we must recognize the importance of what we are and how we think about things. This book is particularly concerned with our personal differences in terms of the actions we choose. Rather than dealing with abstract concepts such as “attitudes” or “values,” a more workable approach is to deal with individual behaviors.

A broad view of the concept of “behavior” is needed to understand self-leadership. Behavior is viewed as taking place at both an observable physical and an unobservable mental level. In fact, the events that come before behavior and the results of behavior take place at both a physical and a mental level. Thus, complex chains of behavioral influence take place. This idea is represented pictorially in Figure 2-1. For example, imagine a person who thinks about the joys of trout fishing and decides to skip work that day, but later feels guilty. This example includes a mental event (thinking about fishing) that comes before and influences an actual physical behavior (skipping work). The physical behavior is followed by a mental result (guilt) which is likely to discourage similar behavior in the future.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint