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Synchronization

One other aspect related to recording that you should know about is synchronization. This subject is fairly complicated and a bit beyond the scope of this book, but you might need to utilize synchronization in two somewhat popular situations. I’ll cover a few of the basics and explain how to use synchronization in those two particular situations.

Synchronization Basics

All music is based on time. Without time, there is no music. To record and play music data, SONAR needs a timing reference. It uses this reference to determine the exact measure, beat, and tick at which an event should be stored during recording or at which it should be played. When you work with SONAR alone, it uses one of two different clock sources as its reference—either the clock built into your computer (internal) or the clock built into your sound card (audio). By default, SONAR uses the internal clock as its timing reference. Because the internal clock cannot be used if you have audio data in your project, SONAR automatically changes the clock to audio when a track’s source is set to an audio input or when an audio file is inserted into the project. So the built-in clock on your sound card provides the timing for all the data you record into a project, and it allows SONAR to keep all the tracks synchronized during playback. This is internal synchronization.


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