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Chapter 16.  Score Editing  >  Understanding Score Layers

Understanding Score Layers

When working on a score, you are placing and editing symbols on three different layers: the note layer, the layout layer, and the global layer.

The note layer represents MIDI events that you may open from a MIDI track. These MIDI events become note symbols on the note layer. On this same layer, you also find other note dependant information that is represented by symbols, such as tempo changes, dynamic indications, or special symbols that represent how notes should be interpreted graphically, such as a trill or an arpeggio. These symbols are all present as long as the note symbols associated with them are present. When you move a note or a bar containing a note, the associated symbols follow. On the other hand, Cubase allows you to lock certain elements on note layers, or create your own set of note layer events that can’t be edited by assigning these elements to a layer and activating it. For example, in Figure 16.6, the note layers 1 and 3 are active (editable) and layer 3, when active, lets you edit stem lengths and keys. In other words, when layer 3 is disabled, you can’t edit stems and keys. When working on a dense musical project, controlling the aspects that can or cannot be modified makes editing easier.


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