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A Guided Tour of Subtractor > The LFO Section - Pg. 208

The three MIDI messages that can be received are: Aftertouch--Also known as channel pressure. This is when a note is held down on a keyboard. Additional pressure can be applied to this note, which sends additional MIDI data. Many keyboards support this feature, so check your manual. Expression Pedal--Looks a lot like a sustain pedal. If your keyboard has an input for it, you can buy an expression pedal at your local music instrument shop. Breath Control--This external source is found mostly on older Yamaha keyboards, but it enables you to mimic the attack of wind instruments. Once you have selected the external source, you can then route the MIDI data to any or all of these parameters. Filter Frequency--When set to a positive value, an External Control message will increase the Filter Frequency parameter. A negative value has the opposite effect. LFO 1--When set to a positive value, an External Control message will increase the LFO amount knob. A negative value has the opposite effect. Amplitude--When set to a positive value, an External Control message will increase the amplitude of the Subtractor. A negative value has the opposite effect. Frequency Modulation--When set to a positive value, an External Control message will increase the Frequency Modulation parameter. A negative value has the opposite effect. Your First Subtractor Patch Now that you have a pretty firm idea of what makes the Subtractor tick, it's time to dig in and create your first customized Subtractor patch. This tutorial takes you through a step-by-step process of programming a pad patch that will be perfect for any ambient occasion. Setting Up a Start Point Before you begin to program your first Subtractor patch, it's important to find a good starting point to begin your synthetic experimentations. As a guitar player, I find it frustrating to play my keyboard while making adjustments to the Subtractor, so I use the Reason sequencer to get around it. By writing in a sequence that is related to the kind of patch I am going to create, the programming process is much quicker and more efficient. Confused? Consider these examples. If I am planning to program a bass synth patch to be used in techno music, I typically write in a standard techno bass line in the Reason sequencer. Then I set the sequencer to play the bass line over and over again in a loop (see Figure 9.10). I can make real-time adjustments to the patch as the sequence is playing and program the patch to complement the style of music I am going to create with the patch.