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Chapter 5. Recording to Picture > Using Audio from the Set (Production Audio)

Using Audio from the Set (Production Audio)

Audio recorded while filming can come to you in many forms. A video editor may give you an OMFI file or an EDL that refers to the original source tapes. An edited version could come on videotape. There are so many sets of circumstances that can occur in the production of a film or video that you must be prepared to handle just about anything. Let’s start with the oldest and most basic way of transferring audio clips, the EDL.

EDLs

An EDL, or Edit Decision List, is a list of time code values and tape names, in the form of a text file generated by the video-editing system, that can be interpreted and used to collect various audio or video segments and place them in a certain order, thereby creating an edited work. Analysis of this text file will tell you where to get each piece of audio and where to put it in time relative to the picture. Analysis can be performed by machines as well as by humans, which is helpful when problems arise. There are three basic standards for EDLs in wide use today: the Sony 9000 EDL, CMX-style EDLs, and the Grass Valley Group version, or GVG. Each one is slightly different but contains the same basic information. The CMX 3600 is the most widely used EDL format, and I’ll use it as an example to further explain how EDLs work and how you can use them with Pro Tools.


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