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Lesson 13. Working with Video in Logic P... > Understanding Video Files and Logic

Understanding Video Files and Logic

If a movie will play in QuickTime Player, it'll play in Logic. The movie itself can use any codec (compression/decompression algorithm) that QuickTime understands, and there's no limitation on the movie's dimensions or data rate. Logic is equally adept at scoring standard definition NTSC videos at 720 by 480 pixels as it is at scoring a banner ad movie at 90 by 700 pixels for a Web site. However, there is one important fact to keep in mind: Logic has to read the movie off your hard disk as it plays it. Logic also has to read your audio off the hard disk. Consequently, if you're scoring a video that uses a high-bandwidth codec such as the Animation codec, resources that could be devoted to reading audio off the hard disk will instead be devoted to reading the movie. The result is that Logic will react slower, and you won't be able to work with as many tracks of audio as you would be able to if the movie used a low-bandwidth codec such as Sorenson 3 or MPEG-4.

Because of this, it is common to score to a proxy movie. A proxy movie is a low-resolution and tightly compressed version of a high-resolution movie. As long as the frame rate remains unaltered, a proxy movie provides enough of a visual reference that you can still score the video, and you will not place as high a strain on your computer as you would using the uncompressed full-bandwidth version.


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