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Chapter 10. Editing MIDI > Audio Editing Versus MIDI Editing

Audio Editing Versus MIDI Editing

Audio and MIDI are very different elements, so it follows that editing and changing one is not much like editing and changing the other. For example, when you work with audio, you can edit at the level of a single sample, whereas MIDI does not have such fine timing resolution. With audio, you can modify the timbre of a sound—its equalization, for example—through processing. In contrast, when you edit MIDI, you generally use the sound generator triggered by the MIDI notes, usually a sampler or synth, to change the EQ of a sound.

Another major difference between editing MIDI and editing audio in Cubase is that you can do much less MIDI editing in the Project window. When you edit audio, you can see and edit both events and parts directly in the Project window. With MIDI, the events are the notes and data, and these cannot be edited in the Project window. For example, you cannot use the Draw tool to add a MIDI note to a part in the Project window—the tool is supposed to be used in the MIDI editors. If you drag with the Draw tool in the Project window, you'll simply create a new part (Figure 10.1). So while you'll learn some MIDI editing tasks that you can do in the Project window, most of this chapter concentrates on the MIDI editors.


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