• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 2. MPEG-4 Overview > MPEG-4 and Other Multimedia Standards

2.5. MPEG-4 and Other Multimedia Standards

The multimedia standards and solutions in place before the MPEG-4 standard was developed influenced the development of MPEG-4. Among the standards and solutions that MPEG-4 has used and referenced, the following are especially relevant:

  1. ISO/IEC MPEG-1 Video [MPEG1-2] and Audio [MPEG1-3], ISO/IEC MPEG-2 Video [MPEG2-2] and Audio [MPEG2-3], and ITU-T H.263 [H263]: MPEG-4 builds on these standards to develop the MPEG-4 data formats for natural audio and video objects. A simple version of MPEG-4 video [MPEG4-2] is compatible with H.263 baseline, the video coding format for H.323 terminals. At the MPEG-4 Systems level, MPEG-4 scenes can include MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 audio and video streams.

  2. ISO/IEC MPEG-1 Systems [MPEG1-1], ISO/IEC MPEG-2 Systems [MPEG2-1] and ITU-T H.223 [H223]: MPEG-4 borrows heavily from the MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 Systems concepts for synchronization and buffer management, adding fundamentally new tools on top of these robust mechanisms. Finally, the MPEG-2 Systems standard [MPEG2-1] supports the transport of MPEG-4 content using MPEG-2 transport mechanisms. The FlexMux tool borrows concepts embodied in recommendation H.223.

  3. Web3D Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML'97) [VRML97]: MPEG-4 bases its scene description solution on the approach specified by VRML'97. MPEG-4 BIFS provides such additional functionality as the integration of streams in the scene, 2D scene graph capabilities, integration of 2D and 3D scene description constructs, advanced audio features such as environmental spatialization, an integrated timing model between the scene graph and the streams, scene update and animation protocols to modify the multimedia description in time, and, in the best of MPEG tradition, compression efficiency for the scene description.

  4. Apple's QuickTime [QUICKTIME]: Among the several file formats for storing, streaming, and authoring multimedia content that were proposed after MPEG called for file format proposals in October of 1997, QuickTime was selected as the basis for the development of the MPEG-4 file format, known as MP4. (None of the proposed formats fulfilled all the identified requirements.)


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint