• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

Compositing

Professional animators often set up complex shots as composites. That means the shot is rendered in several different passes. They do this for several reasons:

  • Huge complex scenes can become cumbersome to load, edit, and save.

  • The client might request changes on specific areas of the frame that have no bearing on its three-dimensionality, and are therefore fast, easy edits in the compositor—color tints, brightness, blurriness, and so forth.

  • Isolated segments of the shot might require effects that can be done much more quickly in 2D.

  • Rendering one element or layer of a shot is much faster than rendering the entire shot again.

  • Most of Maya's particle system effects require separate hardware rendering and compositing to the rest of the scene later.

  • Compositing 2D images is nearly always faster than rendering 3D shots; usually less than one second per frame is required to composite many layers.

  • Breaking a tough shot into parts allows the tasks to be divided among several animators.

  • The client can judge the progress of the final shot at any time (after you do a quick composite of the layers you have rendered so far) and get a clear vision of the design.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint