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Part: IV Appendixes > Differences in Materials

Differences in Materials

LightWave's Surface Editor is called Hypershade in Maya. Hypershade, which works in a much looser way than the Surface Editor, uses floating swatches that are wired together to create materials. For example, a procedural checkered texture can be wired to a material's color input, thus overriding the solid-colored swatch with a checkered texture.

In Maya, materials are edited at their root in the Attribute Editor, where the familiar variables appear: Diffuse, Color, Specularity, and so forth. In Maya, you have more flexibility in wiring any texture to the input of any other texture. For example, in a procedural checkered texture, you could replace each of the two solid colors that normally fill the checkered squares with a unique texture, such as marble. Maya does not have the blending modes that are part of composing textures in LightWave, but you can achieve the same effect with Maya's Layered Texture option for a texture. Maya's procedural textures don't normally leave part of the texture transparent to the underlying texture. In Maya, a texture normally overrides the value it's assigned to. For example, if you assign a checkered material in LightWave, the black squares show through to the underlying texture or the original color assignment. In Maya, the checkered material would completely cover the previous color assignment. If you want underlying colors or textures to show through, use Maya's Layered Texture option.


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