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In This Chapter

After building your scene and animating it, your final steps are usually adding a camera and rendering the animation. A camera is more than just a viewpoint, however. The camera is another part of your project's creative vision, just as movie cinematographers help tell a story by where they place and focus the camera. By working with settings such as zoom and focal length, you can make a mouse seem as big as an elephant or a skyscraper look tiny. Unlike a real camera, Maya's virtual camera has no mass or size, so it can pass through pinholes or change direction instantly. Where you position the camera and how you frame your subject matter are important details in composing your animation and adding depth to your art.

In animation, rendering is the process of generating a series of two-dimensional images from a view of a three-dimensional scene. The images are saved as image files (frames) that can later be placed in sequence to produce an animation. You can also render still frames to sample what the final animated sequence will look like at different points. You have rendered some images in previous tutorials, but in this chapter, you'll delve into some of the more advanced options for rendering.


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