• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 12. Node-Based Architecture > Objects, Shapes, and Components

Objects, Shapes, and Components

The object and component levels in Maya should be fairly well understood. Objects exist in Maya as nodes. These nodes can transform through space as entire objects (as previously stated), like a car can drive down the road. The objects in Maya must also be built from something, just like a car's body is built from steel, aluminum, and rubber. The separate pieces of a node that comprise its actual existence are known as components. The components of a node exist within the object's shape node, while the transforms (translate, rotate, scale) of a node exist within the object's transform node. Therefore, it only makes sense that deformers—and most other creation history (see the section later in this chapter entitled “Viewing the Maya Scene Graph and Node History” for a more detailed explanation of history) and DG nodes—are connected to the shape rather than the transform node. Where else would the deformers go to access the components of the object? In fact, the shape node defines the behavior of the node; you could think of the transform as simply an outer shell for translation, but not creation. This definitive nature also accounts for why it is possible to have multiple shape nodes as children of a single parent transform (from the last example of the previous section).

The shape node is an inherent child of the transform node. This structure is entirely reliable and holds true for almost any visibly selectable node that exists in Maya. There are several easy ways to visually see the object, shape, and component relationships represented through the UI:


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint