• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

Defining Bones

Let’s start by talking about bones, which is a common term in all of 3D animation. Just like human bones, the bones in 3ds max define the linkages between joints (a hierarchy) and the rotations of your character’s joints. In reality, a bone system is nothing more than a set of parented Pivot points, with some kind of visual connection between the Pivot points. In 3ds max 4, that visual representation can be anything: standard bone objects, teapots, lights, spheres, dodeca-whatevers. You get the idea. In fact, every object in max 4 carries a bone property that can be toggled on or off, and that has special squash and stretch capabilities.

A bone object in max has parameters, which are width, height, taper, and fin properties. These help you define the shape of the bone to fit the volume of each limb accurately, filling out the volume of the character. This is important because displaying the skin of a character while animating usually slows your computer down to the point where you’re not interacting with the character in real time. Working with just the bones is very fast, but without a volumetric display of the bones (that is, without the bones being a 3D object), you have no reference of the character’s size and shape. The fins also help you visualize and troubleshoot rotations of the bones.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint